BOOKS RECEIVED:  Jenny T. Chio, “A Landscape of Travel: The Work of Tourism in Rural Ethnic China” (Left Coast Press, 2014)
While the number of domestic leisure travelers has increased dramatically in reform-era China, the persistent gap between urban and rural living standards attests to ongoing social, economic, and political inequalities. The state has widely touted tourism for its potential to… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Wu Rukang and John W Olsen, eds., “Paleoanthropology and Paleolithic Archaeology in the People’s Republic of China,” reprint ed., (Left Coast Press, 2009)
This book represents the first comprehensive attempt to bring to western scholarship the great advances made in Paleolithic archaeology and palaeoanthropology in the Peoples Republic of China. The 15 chapters are devoted to a historical overview of past and recent… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Robert J. Shepherd, “Faith in Heritage: Displacement, Development, and Religious Tourism in Contemporary China” (Left Coast Press, 2013)
Using the example of Chinas Wutai Shan―recently designated both a UNESCO World Heritage site and a national park―Robert J. Shepherd analyzes Chinese applications of western notions of heritage management within a non-western framework. What does the concept of world heritage… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Mingming Wang, “Empire and Local Worlds: A Chinese Model for Long-Term Historical Anthropology” (Left Coast Press, 2009)
Mingming Wang, one of the most prolific anthropologists in China, has produced a work both of long-term historical anthropology and of broad social theory. In it, he traces almost a millennium of history of the southern Chinese city of Quangzhou,… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Anna Kallen, “Stones Standing: Archaeology, Colonialism, and Ecotourism in Northern Laos” (Left Coast Press, 2015)
This book is an inquiry into the relationships between archaeology, colonialism and ecotourism at the famous standing stones of Hintang, Laos. It investigates the conditions under which archaeological knowledge has been produced, appropriated, contested, commodified, and consumed by colonialism from… Read More
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