BOOKS RECEIVED: Heidi C. M. Scott, “Chaos and Cosmos: Literary Roots of Modern Ecology in the British Nineteenth Century” (Penn State UP, 2014)
In Chaos and Cosmos, Heidi Scott integrates literary readings with contemporary ecological methods to investigate two essential and contrasting paradigms of nature that scientific ecology continues to debate: chaos and balance. Ecological literature of the Romantic and Victorian eras… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Nicholas Adams, “Gunnar Asplund’s Gothenburg: The Transformation of Public Architecture in Interwar Europe” (Penn State UP, 2014)
In the west coast port city of Gothenburg, Sweden, the architect Gunnar Asplund built a modest extension to an old courthouse on the main square (1934-36). Judged today to be one of the finest works of modern architecture, the courthouse… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Pablo Garcia Laoeza and Victoria L. Garrett, eds., “The Improbable Conquest: Sixteenth-Century Letters from the Río de la Plata” (Penn State UP, 2014)
The Improbable Conquest offers translations of a series of little-known letters from the chaotic Spanish conquest of the Río de la Plata region, uncovering a rich and understudied historical resource. These letters were written by a wide variety of individuals,… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Alina Payne, ed., “Vision and Its Instruments: Art, Science, and Technology in Early Modern Europe” (Penn State UP, 2015)
Starting with Brunelleschi’s invention of perspective and Galileo’s invention of the telescope—two inaugural moments in the history of vision, from two apparently distinct provinces, art and science—this volume of essays by noted art, architecture, science, philosophy, and literary historians teases… Read More
BOOKS RECEIVED: Thomas W. Barton, “Contested Treasure: Jews and Authority in the Crown of Aragon” (Penn State UP, 2014)
In Contested Treasure, Thomas Barton examines how the Jews in the Crown of Aragon in the twelfth through fourteenth centuries negotiated the overlapping jurisdictions and power relations of local lords and the crown. The thirteenth century was a formative… Read More
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