Elias Sacks, “Moses Mendelssohn’s Living Script: Philosophy, Practice, History, Judaism” (Indiana UP, 2016)
The work of Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786), one of Judaism’s great philosophers and defenders, has nonetheless defied easy categorization or definitive depiction. While advocating for the granting of full rights to the Jews of Germany, Mendelssohn also was cast in the… Read More
Andreas Gorke and Johanna Pink, “Tafsir and Islamic Intellectual History: Exploring the Boundaries of a Genre” (Oxford UP, 2015)
What does it mean to interpret the Qur’an? What kinds of literary genres have produced and continue to produce such inquiry? Is tafsir only a line-by-line commentary or could it be something broader, blended with genres of law, storytelling, or… Read More
Zachary Lockman, “Field Notes: The Making of Middle Eastern Studies in the United States” (Stanford UP, 2016)
The dominant narrative in the history of the study of the Middle East has claimed that the Cold War was what pushed Middle East studies to develop, as part of a greater trend in area studies. Drawing on his previous… Read More
Bruce Fink, “A Clinical Introduction to Freud: Techniques for Everyday Practice” (Norton, 2017)
Bruce Fink joins me once again, this time to discuss his latest book, A Clinical Introduction to Freud: Techniques For Everyday Practice (W. W. Norton & Co., 2017). What prompted Fink, a world-renowned Lacanian analyst, to return to… Read More
Raul Coronado, “A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture” (Harvard UP, 2013)
In A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture (Harvard University Press 2013) Dr. Raul Coronado provides an intellectual history of the Spanish America’s decentered from the dominant narrative of Enlightenment, revolution, and independence stemming… Read More
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