Daniel Peris

The Dividend Imperative

How Dividends Can Narrow the Gap between Main Street and Wall Street

McGrawHill 2013

New Books in EconomicsNew Books in Politics & SocietyNew Books Network July 26, 2013 Marshall Poe

When you buy a stock, you’re buying a piece of a company. The funny thing is that most people who own stocks either don’t...

When you buy a stock, you’re buying a piece of a company. The funny thing is that most people who own stocks either don’t know that or, if they do, don’t act like owners. They could care less about the business itself. They don’t care whether it turns a profit, how big that profit is, or whether they are going to get a cut of the profit. All they care about is the stock price: up = good; down = bad. According to portfolio manager Daniel Peris, this narrow-minded focus on stock price is a real problem both for companies and the folks like you and me who invest in them. What everyone should be paying attention to, says Peris, is how much companies pay out in dividends to investors. In The Strategic Dividend Investor: Why Slow and Steady Wins the Race (McGrawHill, 2011), Peris lays out the case to investors, urging them to invest in companies that distribute dividends regularly. In The Dividend Imperative: How Dividends Can Narrow the Gap between Main Street and Wall Street (McGrawHill, 2013), he lays out the case to the companies themselves, urging them to stop using their cash to buy their own stock back and instead reward investors with dividends. According to his convincing analysis, a return to dividend payment will benefit both corporations and investors. Listen in and find out why.

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