From the moment he entered politics as the manager of John F. Kennedy’s 1952 Senate campaign, Robert Kennedy’s political career was subsumed into that...

From the moment he entered politics as the manager of John F. Kennedy’s 1952 Senate campaign, Robert Kennedy’s political career was subsumed into that of his older brother. With President Kennedy’s assassination in November 1963 his grief-stricken younger brother suddenly found himself unmoored politically. In The Revolution of Robert Kennedy: From Power to Protest after JFK (Bloomsbury Press, 2017), John Bohrer describes how Robert Kennedy came into his own in the years that followed. Now bearing the weight of a nation’s expectations, Robert faced both the pressure to uphold his brother’s legacy and the hostility of the new president. With Lyndon Johnson forestalling any effort to make Robert his running mate in 1964, Kennedy focused his aspirations instead on the United States Senate, winning a seat in New York against a popular incumbent. As Bohrer demonstrates, once in the Senate Kennedy quickly emerged as a political leader in his own right, as he used his outsized prominence to address the issues that mattered most to him.

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