Josie Flint, known as Jaybird, narrates her story of life in Atlanta during the turbulent South as Jim Crow laws come to an end....

Josie Flint, known as Jaybird, narrates her story of life in Atlanta during the turbulent South as Jim Crow laws come to an end. Her school desegregates. The country meanders through new ideas brought about by the Civil Rights movement. And the perfect childhood Jaybird treasured is shattered. The narrative alternates between Josie’s childhood and thirty-five years later when her grandmother, Annie Jo, dies. A family secret brings a new heartache for Josie as she struggles to rise against tragedy with grace while maintaining family loyalty.

Not only does Jaybird’s Song (Kathy Wilson Florence, 2017) have strong female characters, but also the turbulent 1960s South is its own character. Additionally, for the modern woman, Jaybird’s Song grapples with sexuality and aggression from the opposite sex in a time before trigger warnings and rape culture awareness. Florence notes she too dealt with an embarrassing sexual incident as a child which she has not told her parents, even as an adult. “Why do girls feel guilt and not tell?” Florence’s novel tackles the perplexity of coming to age and the obstacles in the maternal matrix of mothers and daughters.

Kathy Wilson Florence lives in Dunwoody, Georgia with her husband and two daughters. She is a full-time Realtor with her husband. Durning her off hours, Florence runs her own graphic design, copywriting and marketing business, Right Brain Communications, and writes novels. She was a weekly columnist for the Dunwoody Crier newspaper for 16 years where she penned Over the Picket Fence. A collection of favorite columns can be found in her first book, You’ve Got a Wedgie Cha Cha Cha.

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