New Books Network

F. Henry and D. Plaza, “Carnival Is Woman: Feminism and Performance in Caribbean Mas” (UP of Mississippi, 2019)
Through a feminist perspective, Carnival Is Woman: Feminism and Performance in Caribbean Mas (University Press of Mississippi, 2019) examines the presence of women in contemporary Carnival by demonstrating not only their strength in numbers, but also the ways in which they participate in the festivities. Exploring different themes, the authors... Read More
Amelia Moore, “Destination Anthropocene: Science and Tourism in The Bahamas” (U California Press, 2019)
Despite being a minor contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, like many other small island nations, The Bahamas’s ecology and society are especially vulnerable to current and expected changes to the oceans and the climate. Spectacular coral reefs, low-lying islands, and a social life oriented towards the sea makes The... Read More
C. Besteman and H. Gusterson, “Life by Algorithms: How Roboprocesses Are Remaking Our World” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
How can we understand computerization as a social process? Life by Algorithms: How Roboprocesses Are Remaking Our World (University of Chicago Press, 2019) is a timely and welcome edited volume in which a set of interdisciplinary contributors explore how people make automated processes work, and how these systems reciprocally transform... Read More
Pamila Gupta, “Portuguese Decolonization in the Indian Ocean World: History and Ethnography” (Bloomsbury, 2020)
Pamila Gupta’s Portuguese Decolonization in the Indian Ocean World: History and Ethnography (Bloomsbury Academic Press, 2020), takes a unique approach to examining decolonization processes across Lusophone India and Southern Africa, focusing on Goa, Mozambique, Angola and South Africa, weaving together case studies using five interconnected themes. Gupta considers decolonization through... Read More
Ghassan Moussawi, “Disruptive Situations: Fractal Orientalism and Queer Strategies in Beirut” (Temple UP, 2020)
Disruptive Situations: Fractal Orientalism and Queer Strategies in Beirut (Temple UP, 2020) challenges representations of contemporary Beirut as an exceptional space for LGBTQ people by highlighting everyday life in a city where violence is the norm. Ghassan Moussawi, a Beirut native, seeks to uncover the underlying processes of what he... Read More
Lauren R. Kerby, “Saving History: How White Evangelicals Tour the Nation’s Capital and Redeem a Christian America” (UNC Press, 2020)
Millions of tourists visit Washington D.C. every year, vying to see its landscape, museums, and buildings and learn about seminal moments in US history. Attracting white evangelicals to the nation’s capital, Christian heritage tours contribute to the thriving tourist industry in D.C. In Saving History: How White Evangelicals Tour the... Read More
Maile Arvin, “Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai‘i and Oceania” (Duke UP, 2020)
From their earliest encounters with Indigenous Pacific Islanders, white Europeans and Americans saw Polynesians as almost racially white, and speculated that they were of Mediterranean or Aryan descent. In Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai‘i and Oceania (Duke University Press, 2020) Maile Arvin argues that a... Read More
Nadia Eghbal, “Working in Public: The Making and Maintenance of Open Source Software” (Stripe Press, 2020)
Open source is the once-radical idea that code should be freely available to everyone. Open-source software was once an optimistic model for public collaboration, but is now a near-universal standard. But most open-source code is not developed by big teams or equitable collaborations; it’s maintained by unseen individuals who work... Read More
Jill A. Fisher, “Adverse Events: Race, Inequality, and the Testing of New Pharmaceuticals” (NYU Press, 2020)
Imagine that you volunteer for the clinical trial of an experimental drug. The only direct benefit of participating is that you will receive up to $5,175. You must spend twenty nights literally locked in a research facility. You will be told what to eat, when to eat, and when to... Read More
Jennifer Atkins, “New Orleans Carnival Balls: The Secret Side of Mardi Gras, 1870-1920” (LSU Press, 2017)
In New Orleans Carnival Balls: The Secret Side of Mardi Gras, 1870-1920 (LSU Press, 2017), Dr. Jennifer Atkins draws back the curtain on the origin of the exclusive Mardi Gras balls, bringing to light unique traditions unseen by outsiders. The oldest Carnival organizations emerged in the mid-nineteenth century and ruled... Read More