New Books Network

Valerie Wayne, “Women’s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England” (Bloomsbury, 2020)
Women’s Labour and the History of the Book in Early Modern England (Bloomsbury, 2020) reveals the valuable work that women achieved in publishing, printing, writing and reading early modern English books, from those who worked in the book trade to those who composed, selected, collected and annotated books. Women gathered... Read More
Allison L. Rowland, “Zoetropes and the Politics of Humanhood” (Ohio State UP, 2020)
The way that we talk about living beings can raise or lower their perceived value. On this episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (s/t) interviews Dr. Allison L. Rowland (s) about zoetropes and zoerhetorics or ways of talking about living beings that promote (#blacklivesmatter) or demote (“collateral... Read More
Xiaoqiao Ling, “Feeling the Past in Seventeenth-Century China” (Harvard Asia Center, 2019)
As much of the world’s population is currently discovering, living through a historical cataclysm is a more common fact of human existence than one might think. Perhaps one reason why this is easily forgotten is the fact that it is hard to make the empathetic leap between oneself and other... Read More
K. Keeling and S. Pollard, “Table Lands: Food in Children’s Literature” (U Mississippi Press, 2020)
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks Kara Keeling and Scott Pollard about their new book, Table Lands: Food in Children’s Literature, published June 2020 by University of Mississippi Press. Table Lands contributes to a growing body of scholarship in the subfield of literary food studies, which combines the methods... Read More
Naomi Appleton, “Many Buddhas, One Buddha: A Study and Translation of Avadānaśataka 1-40” (Equinox, 2020)
Naomi Appleton‘s new book Many Buddhas, One Buddha: A Study and Translation of Avadānaśataka 1-40 (Equinox Publishing, 2020) introduces a significant section of the important early Indian Buddhist text known as the Avadānaśataka, or “One Hundred Stories”, and explores some of its perspectives on buddhahood. This text, composed in Sanskrit... Read More
Barry Witham, “From Red-Baiting to Blacklisting: The Labor Plays of Manny Fried” (SIU Press 2020)
From Red-Baiting to Blacklisting: The Labor Plays of Manny Fried (SIU Press 2020) collects three plays by Manny Fried alongside a thorough explanation of his work and life by theatre scholar Barry Witham. Witham traces Fried’s long career as a labor organizer and Communist Party militant, as well as the... Read More
Kim Adrian, “Dear Knausgaard: Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle” (Fiction Advocate, 2020)
In 2009, a novel was released in Norway with a fairly simple premise; the author would simply write about himself, his life and his attempts to write. The autobiographical novel would be the first in a 6-volume series that would eventually total over 3,500 pages written in just 3 short... Read More
Linda Goddard, “Savage Tales: The Writings of Paul Gauguin” (Yale UP, 2019)
In Savage Tales: The Writings of Paul Gauguin (Yale University Press, 2019), Linda Goddard investigates the role that Paul Gauguin’s writings played in his artistic practice and in his negotiation of his colonial identity. As a French artist who lived in Polynesia, Gauguin occupies a crucial position in histories of... Read More
Vanita Reddy, “Fashioning Diaspora: Beauty, Femininity and South Asian American Culture” (Temple UP, 2016)
Vanita Reddy, in her book Fashioning Diaspora: Beauty, Femininity and South Asian American Culture (Temple University Press, 2016), locates diasporic transnationality, affiliations and intimacies through the analytic of beauty. Through her analysis of Asian American literary fiction and performance artwork and installations, Reddy lingers on moments, objects and subjective positions that reveal the potentiality of beauty. Not just... Read More
Brett Dakin, “American Daredevil: Comics, Communism, and The Battles of Lev Gleason” (Chapterhouse, 2020)
In American Daredevil: Comics, Communism, and The Battles of Lev Gleason (Chapterhouse Publishing, 2020), Brett Dakin, Gleason’s great-nephew delves into the life of his famous relative. Gleason rose to the top of the comic publishing world during its Golden Age, publishing Daredevil and Crime Does Not Pay among other titles.... Read More