New Books Network

Felix Gilman, “The Rise of Ransom City” (Tor, 2012)
I first learned about Felix Gilman‘s work from the influential academic blog Crooked Timber. I proceeded to read Thunderer, Gears of the City, and Half-Made World and found myself impressed by Gilman’s distinctive settings, themes, and voice. It should surprise no one, in my view, that Thunderer received a nomination... Read More
Ron McCabe, “Betrayed” (Telemachus Press, 2012)
As a journalist and author I usually work in factual financial news and analysis. Recently however, I have noticed an apparent increase in books that wrap the real financial tumult of our times into a fictional novel, thereby allowing the author to make a personal statement, blend characters and events... Read More
Dinty W. Moore, “The Rose Metal Press Guide to Flash Nonfiction: Advice and Essential Exercises from Respected Writers, Editors, and Teachers” (Rose Metal Press, 2012)
In 1997, writer Dinty W. Moore launched a literary journal on a then-novel platform: the World Wide Web.  The journal, which he called Brevity, created a forum for works of nonfiction under 750 words in length.  Since it’s inaugural issue, Brevity has published hundreds of pieces that thrive on the... Read More
Anthony Bale, “The Book of Marvels and Travels” (Oxford UP, 2012)
Anthony Bale‘s new translation of Sir John Mandeville’s classic account is an exciting and engaging text that’s accessible to a wide range of readers. The Book of Marvels and Travels (Oxford University Press, 2012) recounts a fourteenth-century journey across the medieval world, albeit one that was likely written as the... Read More
Alastair Reynolds, “Blue Remembered Earth” (Gollancz, 2012)
Blue Remembered Earth (Gollantz, 2012) takes place roughly 150 years in the future. Climate change, as well as the political and economic rise of Africa, have transformed the planet. Humanity is colonizing the solar system. Geoffrey Akinya, grandson of a visionary businesswoman, cares most about his scientific work with elephants.... Read More
Madeline Ashby, “vN: The First Machine Dynasty” (Angry Robot Books, 2012)
Amy Peterson is a five-year old self-replicating android who lives with her synthetic mother and human “father.” Her struggles might be that of any super-intelligent youngster whose body and mind mark her as different than her schoolmates, but then her grandmother, Portia, appears at her kindergarten graduation and attacks her... Read More
Meagan Spooner, “Skylark” (Carolrhoda Books, 2012)
Lark Ainsley lives within a near-hermetically sealed city located in a world scarred and depleted my magical wars. The Architects, who oversee the City, maintain it by harvesting the non-renewable magical energy found in each of the city’s inhabitants. But something goes wrong on Lark’s “Harvest Day,” and she soon... Read More
D.B. Jackson, “Thieftaker” (Tor Books, 2012)
“D.B. Jackson” is David B. Coe’s pen name for his new historical-fantasy series, The Thieftaker Chronicles. Thieftaker (Tor Books, 2012) centers on Ethan Kaille, a private detective and conjurer, as he investigates a murder in colonial Boston. David, who received a Ph.D. in U.S. history from Stanford University before embarking on... Read More
Ken MacLeod, “The Night Sessions” (Pyr, 2012)
I met Ken MacLeod when we participated in a sequence of “Science Fiction and International Orders” panels at the London School of Economics in the winter of 2011. Ken is an important figure in his own right, as well as someone who has contributed a great deal to the Speculative-Ficiton... Read More
Alison Miers, “Charlinder’s Walk” (CreateSpace, 2011)
In our very first fiction-book interview on New Books in Secularism, we chat with Alyson Miers, author of Charlinder’s Walk (CreateSpace, 2011). In this adventure secularism-themed novel, Miers introduces us to Charlinder, a curious and daring young man who lives in the year 2130. The world he lives in is... Read More