New Books Network

Ryan Weber, “Cosmopolitanism and Transatlantic Circles in Music and Literature” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018)
Musicologists have long tried to understand how cosmopolitanism and nationalism affected classical music. Ryan Weber takes on this task in his book, Cosmopolitanism and Transatlantic Circles in Music and Literature (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018). Using the music and ideas of Edvard Grieg, Edward MacDowell, and Percy Grainger as his lens, Weber... Read More
Kyle Devine, “Decomposed: The Political Ecology of Music” (MIT Press, 2019)
What is the human and environmental cost of music? In Decomposed: The Political Ecology of Music (MIT Press, 2019), Kyle Devine, an Associate Professor in the Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo, tells the material history of recorded music, counting the impact of music from the 78 to... Read More
Mark Katz, “Build: The Power of Hip Hop Diplomacy in a Divided World” (Oxford UP, 2019)
In April 2014, a cohort of twenty-five hip hop artists assembled in Washington, D.C. for the first orientation meeting of a new cultural diplomacy program sponsored by the United States State Department. Next Level brings hip hop practitioners from the United States to other countries where they collaborate with local... Read More
Jane D. Hatter, “Composing Community in Late Medieval Music: Self-Reference, Pedagogy, and Practice” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
There are a handful of pieces from the Medieval and Renaissance periods that most music students learn about in their introductory history courses; among them are Guillaume Du Fay’s, Ave regina celorum III and Johannes Ockeghem’s Missa Prolationum. Some of these foundational compositions have been studied by musicologists for over... Read More
Laura K. T. Stokes, “Fanny Hensel: A Research and Information Guide” (Routledge, 2019)
Nineteenth-century composer Fanny Hensel is the subject of more published research than any other woman of the period, with the possible exception of Clara Schumann. A prolific composer, salon hostess, and a member of a well-connected and prominent family, she was one of the first women composers that musicologists studied... Read More
Richard F. Thomas, “Why Bob Dylan Matters” (Dey Street, 2017)
When the Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded to Bob Dylan in 2016, a debate raged. Some celebrated, while many others questioned the choice.  How could the world’s most prestigious book prize be awarded to a famously cantankerous singer-songwriter who wouldn’t even deign to attend the medal ceremony? In Why... Read More
Lincoln A. Mitchell, “San Francisco Year Zero” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
1978 was the year that changed San Francisco forever, writes Lincoln A. Mitchell in San Francisco Year Zero: Political Upheaval, Punk Rock and a Third-Place Baseball Team (Rutgers University Press, 2019). After the long hangover from the heady 1960s and summer of love, San Francisco was, by the late ‘70s,... Read More
Nina Sun Eidsheim, “The Race of Sound: Listening, Timbre and Vocality in African American Music” (Duke UP, 2019)
In 2018, Nicolle R. Holliday and Daniel Villarreal published the results of a study they conducted asking people to rank how “black” President Obama sounded when given four different examples of his speech. Dr. Nina Sun Eidsheim’s latest book, The Race of Sound: Listening Timbre and Vocality in African American... Read More