New Books Network

Marianna Ritchey, “Composing Capital: Classical Music in the Neoliberal Era” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
What is the place of classical music in contemporary society? In Composing Capital: Classical Music in the Neoliberal Era (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Marianna Ritchey, an assistant professor of music history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, explores the relationship between neoliberal capitalism and classical music, showing how many of... Read More
Creshema R. Murray, “Leadership Through the Lens: Interrogating Production, Presentation, and Power” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017)
Television informs our perceptions and expectations of leaders and offers a guide to understanding how we, as organizational actors, should communicate, act, and relate. Join NBN host Lee Pierce (s/t) and editor/contributor Dr. Creshema Murray as they discuss Leadership Through the Lens: Interrogating Production, Presentation, and Power (Rowman and Littlefield,... Read More
Grace Elizabeth Hale, “Cool Town: How Athens, Georgia, Launched Alternative Music and Changed American Culture” (UNC Press, 2020)
In Cool Town: How Athens, Georgia, Launched Alternative Music and Changed American Culture (University of North Carolina Press), Grace Elizabeth Hale tells the epic story of the Athens, Georgia music scene. Hale explains how a small college town hard to get to even from Atlanta gave rise to dozens of... Read More
François Clemmons, “Officer Clemmons: A Memoir” (Catapult, 2020)
In Officer Clemmons: A Memoir (Catapult, 2020), François Clemmons tells the story of how he became the first ever African-American recurring character on a children’s television when he took on the role of the friendly police officer in Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. But this book is more than a behind-the-scenes show... Read More
Greg Garrett, “A Long, Long Way: Hollywood’s Unfinished Journey from Racism to Reconciliation” (Oxford UP, 2020)
In his powerful new book, A Long, Long Way: Hollywood’s Unfinished Journey from Racism to Reconciliation (Oxford University Press, 2020), Greg Garrett brings his signature brand of theologically motivated cultural criticism to bear on this history. After more than a century of cinema, he argues, movies have altered our cultural perspectives... Read More
Shana Redmond, “Everything Man: The Form and Function of Paul Robeson” (Duke UP, 2020)
In Everything Man: The Form and Function of Paul Robeson (Duke University Press, 2020), Shana Redmond explores the ways in which Paul Robeson, silenced by state repression in his lifetime, still speaks to us today. Through explorations of Robeson’s genre-defying genius as well as reflections on how Robeson’s legacy continues... Read More
Clifford Mason, “Macbeth in Harlem: Black Theater in America from the Beginning to Raisin in the Sun” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
Macbeth in Harlem: Black Theater in America from the Beginning to Raisin in the Sun (Rutgers University Press, 2020) by Clifford Mason, celebrated actor, director, writer, and playwright, and author of thirty-four plays, is a sweeping history of Black theatre from the early nineteenth century through 1959. With an “Introduction”... Read More
Minou Arjomand, “Staged: Show Trials, Political Theater, and the Aesthetics of Judgment” (Columbia UP, 2020)
In Staged: Show Trials, Political Theater, and the Aesthetics of Judgment (Columbia University Press, 2020), Minou Arjomand provides a startling account of the many intersections between theatre and trials in Germany and the United States from the 1930s to the 1960s. Through case studies of Hannah Arendt, Bertolt Brecht, and... Read More
Ian Burrows, “Shakespeare for Snowflakes: On Slapstick and Sympathy” (Zero Books, 2020)
In Shakespeare for Snowflakes: On Slapstick and Sympathy (Zero Books, 2020), Ian Burrows examines the fraught meeting place of slapstick and tragedy, asking us under what literary and performative conditions we extend and withhold sympathy. Using source material as diverse as YouTube comments and the plays of Sarah Kane and... Read More