New Books Network

Nick Prior, “Popular Music, Digital Technology and Society” (SAGE, 2018)
Nick Prior—Professor of Cultural Sociology at the University of Edinburgh—discusses his new book, Popular Music, Digital Technology and Society (SAGE Publications, 2018). The book explores the social, cultural and industrial contexts for the changes that have taken place in popular music since the widespread adoption of digital technology by creators,... Read More
Lana Lesley, “Rude Mechs’ Lipstick Traces” (53rd State, 2019)
Rude Mechs’ Lipstick Traces (53rd State Press, 2019) is Lana Lesley’s graphic novelization of Lipstick Traces by Austin-based theatre collective Rude Mechs, itself an adaptation of Greil Marcus’ classic book Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the 20th Century. The graphic novel vibrantly recreates the experience of watching Rude Mechs... Read More
Rebecca J. Kissane and Sarah Winslow, “Whose Game?: Gender and Power in Fantasy Sports” (Temple UP, 2020)
Fantasy sports have the opportunity to provide a sporting community in which gendered physical presence plays no role—a space where men and women can compete and interact on a level playing field. Whose Game?: Gender and Power in Fantasy Sports (Temple UP, 2020) shows, however, that while many turn to... Read More
J. Packer and E. Stoneman, “A Feeling of Wrongness: Pessimistic Rhetoric on the Fringes of Popular Culture” (Penn State UP, 2019)
On this episode, Lee Pierce (she/they) interviews Joe Packer of Central Michigan University about A Feeling of Wrongness: Pessimistic Rhetoric on the Fringes of Popular Culture (Penn State UP, 2019), an intriguing book attempting to rescue pessimism from the dustbin of public emotion and philosophical thought. From the work of... Read More
Tyler Bickford, “Tween Pop: Children’s Music and Public Culture” (Duke UP, 2020)
In his new book, Tween Pop: Children’s Music and Public Culture (Duke University Press, 2020), Tyler Bickford explores how the tween music market rose during the mid to late 2000s. Bickford addresses the ways in which the music industry seized only childishness as a key element in legitimizing children’s participation... Read More
James Shapiro, “Shakespeare in a Divided America” (Penguin, 2020)
In Shakespeare in a Divided America: What His Plays Tell Us About Our Past and Future (Penguin, 2020) renowned Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro turns his attention to the reception of Shakespeare in the US from the colonial period to the present. Shapiro brings us a John Quincy Adams morbidly obsessed... Read More
Peter La Chapelle, “I’d Fight the World: A Political History of Old-Time, Hillbilly, and Country Music” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
Historians, musicologists, and sociologists have long studied the relationship between politics and music. Peter La Chapelle’s new book, I’d Fight the World: A Political History of Old-Time, Hillbilly, and Country Music (University of Chicago Press, 2019) traces interactions between country music and politics beginning with two late nineteenth-century politicians who... Read More
Caspar Melville, “It’s a London Thing: How Rare Groove, Acid House and Jungle Remapped the City” (Manchester UP, 2019)
How does music help us to understand the contemporary city? In It’s a London Thing: How Rare Groove, Acid House and Jungle Remapped the City (Manchester UP, 2019), Caspar Melville, co-chair of the Centre for Creative Industries, Media and Screen Studies at SOAS, University of London, explores three music scenes to... Read More
Joseph Rex Young, “George R.R. Martin and the Fantasy Form” (Routledge, 2019)
“In the game of thrones you either win or you die”––with over 10 million viewers per episode of Game of Thrones, one of the most successful television shows of all time, George R.R. Martin definitely wins. The success of the show is even more amazing considering it’s genre television––fantasy, to... Read More