New Books Network

C. De Beukelaer and K. M. Spence, “Global Cultural Economy” (Routledge, 2018)
How should we understand the role of cultural industries in contemporary society? In Global Cultural Economy (Routledge) Christiaan De Beukelaer, a senior lecturer in cultural policy at the University of Melbourne, and Kim-Marie Spence, a postdoctoral researcher at Solent University, explore and explain the interrelationship between culture and economy across... Read More
Joanna Stingray, “Red Wave: An American in the Soviet Music Underground” (Doppelhouse Press, 2020)
Red Wave: An American in the Soviet Music Underground (Doppelhouse Press, 2020) is Joanna Stingray’s autobiographical account of her time on the underground music scene in the USSR and Russia in the late 1980s and early 1990s. During this time Joanna met and worked with some of the most important... Read More
M. Hinds and J. Silverman, “Johnny Cash International: How and Why Fans Love the Man in Black” (U Iowa Press, 2020)
In Johnny Cash International: How and Why Fans Love the Man in Black (University of Iowa Press, 2020), Michael Hinds and Jonathan Silverman examine transnational and translocal fandoms and the legacy of Johnny Cash beyond the United States. Hinds and Silverman explore Cash fandom through YouTube comments, fan pilgrimages to... Read More
Dana Renga, “Watching Sympathetic Perpetrators on Italian Television: Gomorrah and Beyond” (Palgrave MacMillan, 20
In Watching Sympathetic Perpetrators on Italian Television: Gomorrah and Beyond (Palgrave MacMillan, 2019), Dana Renga offers the first comprehensive study of recent, popular Italian television. Building on work in American television studies, audience and reception theory, and masculinity studies, her book examines how and why viewers are positioned to engage... Read More
Lauren F. Klein, “An Archive of Taste: Race and Eating in the Early United States” (U Minnesota Press, 2020)
There is no eating in the archive. This is not only a practical admonition to any would-be researcher but also a methodological challenge, in that there is no eating—or, at least, no food—preserved among the printed records of the early United States. Synthesizing a range of textual artifacts with accounts... Read More
Waleed Mahdi, “Arab Americans in Film: From Hollywood and Egyptian Stereotypes to Self-Representation” (Syracuse UP, 2020)
Dr. Waleed Mahdi’s book, Arab Americans in Film: From Hollywood and Egyptian Stereotypes to Self-Representation (Syracuse University Press) offers a comparative analysis of the portrayals of Arab Americans in film and interrogates how such representations have been, and continue to be, disrupted and challenged. By approaching such cinematic representations as... Read More
Elspeth H. Brown, “Work! A Queer History of Modeling” (Duke UP, 2019)
From the haute couture runways of Paris and New York and editorial photo shoots for glossy fashion magazines to reality television, models have been a ubiquitous staple of twentieth- and twenty-first-century American consumer culture. In Work! A Queer History of Modeling (Duke University Press, 2019), Elspeth H. Brown traces the... Read More
Lauren Michele Jackson, “White Negroes: When Cornrows Were in Vogue … and Other Thoughts on Cultural Appropriation” (Beacon, 2019)
In White Negroes: When Cornrows Were in Vogue … and Other Thoughts on Cultural Appropriation (Beacon, 2019), Lauren Michele Jackson analyzes Christina Aguilera, high fashion, the conceptual poetry of Kenneth Goldsmith, digital blackface, and the dearly departed video platform Vine. She demonstrates that cultural appropriation (especially of Black culture by... Read More
Kyle Barnett, “Record Cultures: The Transformation of the U.S. Recording Industry” (U Michigan Press, 2020)
In Record Cultures: The Transformation of the U.S. Recording Industry (University of Michigan Press, 2020), Kyle Barnett tells the story of the smaller U.S. record labels in the 1920s that created the genres later to be known as blues, country, and jazz. Barnett also engages the early recording industry as... Read More
Nate Marshall, “Finna: Poems” (One World, 2020)
In Finna: Poems (One World), his new collection of poetry, Nate Marshall examines the way that pop culture influences Black vernacular, the role of storytelling, family, and place. Marshall defines finna as: fin·na /ˈfinə/ contraction: (1) going to; intending to [rooted in African American Vernacular English] (2) eye dialect spelling... Read More