New Books Network

Ralph James Savarese, “See It Feelingly: Classic Novels, Autistic Readers, and the Schooling of a No-Good English Professor” (Duke UP, 2018)
From the earliest days of medical research into autism, both psychologists and the general public have characterised those on the autism spectrum as literal-minded, unimaginative and lacking in empathy. While in recent years a fresh emphasis on neurodiversity has served to sweep aside this kind of reductive thinking, many people... Read More
Dave Dillon, “Blueprint for Success in College and Career” (Rebus Community Press, 2018)
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (she/they)–Asst. Prof. of Rhetoric at SUNY Geneseo–interviews Dave Dillon of Grossmont College–on a valuable work for higher education: Blueprint for Success in College and Career, available under a Creative Commons License (open access) from the Rebus Community Press (2018). Although... Read More
Linda K. Wertheimer, “Faith Ed: Teaching About Religion in an Age of Intolerance” (Beacon Press, 2017)
Faith Ed: Teaching About Religion in an Age of Intolerance (Beacon Press, 2017) by Linda K. Wertheimer profiles the beauty and difficulty of teaching about religion in public schools. Teaching about religion in a public school in the United States is rewarding, but very difficult. It is not hyperbolic to... Read More
Elizabeth Todd-Breland, “A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago since the 1960s” (UNC Press, 2018)
Elizabeth Todd-Breland’s new book A Political Education: Black Politics and Education Reform in Chicago since the 1960s (University of North Carolina Press, 2018) tells the story of the struggle for educational reform in one of America’s biggest and most segregated cities. By highlighting the activism of local Black women and Black... Read More
S. A. Duncan and A. McClellan, “The Art of Curating: Paul J. Sachs and the Museum Course at Harvard” (Getty Research Institute, 2018)
Andrew McClellan and Sally Anne Duncan’s book offers a behind-the-scenes exploration of the career of Paul J. Sachs (1878-1965) and the graduate program he developed at Harvard University and the Fogg Museum that came to be known as the “museum course.” Sachs and the course played a major role in... Read More
Joy Lisi Rankin, “A People’s History of Computing in the United States” (Harvard UP, 2018)
We know, perhaps too well, the innovation-centric history of personal computing. Yet, computer users were not necessarily microelectronics consumers from the get-go; rather, earlier efforts to expand mainframe computing as a public utility made elite information technology accessible to a wide audience. In A People’s History of Computing in the... Read More