New Books Network

Matthew A. Sutton, “Double Crossed: The Missionaries Who Spied for the United States During the Second World War” (Basic Books, 2019)
What makes a good missionary makes a good spy. Or so thought “Wild” Bill Donovan when he secretly recruited a team of religious activists for the Office of Strategic Services. They entered into a world of lies, deception, and murder, confident that their nefarious deeds would eventually help them expand... Read More
David Lindsay Roberts, “Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans through History” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)
The institutional history of mathematics in the United States comprises several entangled traditions—military, civil, academic, industrial—each of which merits its own treatment. David Lindsay Roberts, adjunct professor of mathematics at Prince George’s Community College, takes a very different approach. His unique book, Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans... Read More
Elena Albarrán, “Seen and Heard in Mexico: Children and Revolutionary Cultural Nationalism” (U Nebraska Press, 2014)
Elena Jackson Albarrán’s book Seen and Heard in Mexico: Children and Revolutionary Cultural Nationalism (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) explores the changing politics of childhood during the period 1920-1940, in the wake of the Mexican Revolution. That conflict, a civil war which brought down an authoritarian regime, came with new... Read More
Lara Saguisag, “Incorrigibles and Innocents: Constructing Childhood and Citizenship in Progressive Era Comics” (Rutgers UP, 2018)
Histories and criticism of comics note that comic strips published in the Progressive Era were dynamic spaces in which anxieties about race, ethnicity, class, and gender were expressed, perpetuated, and alleviated. The proliferation of comic strip children—white and nonwhite, middle-class and lower class, male and female—suggests that childhood was a... Read More
Richard Bell, “Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home” (Simon and Schuster, 2019)
Richard Bell is the author of Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home, published by Simon & Schuster in 2019. Stolen tells the true story of how five young Black boys were kidnapped from Philadelphia in 1825. Dr. Bell recounts the boys’ journey as they... Read More
David Farber, “Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
A shattering account of the crack cocaine years from award-winning American historian David Farber, Crack: Rock Cocaine, Street Capitalism, and the Decade of Greed (Cambridge University Press, 2019) tells the story of the young men who bet their lives on the rewards of selling ‘rock’ cocaine, the people who gave... Read More
Eric D. Weitz, “A World Divided: The Global Struggle for Human Rights in the Age of Nation-States” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Who has the right to have rights? Motivated by Hannah Arendt’s famous reflections on the question of statelessness the book tells a non-linear global story of the emergence and transformations of human rights in the age of nation-states. In his new book A World Divided: The Global Struggle for Human... Read More