New Books Network

A. K. Sandoval-Strausz, “Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City” (Basic Books, 2019)
In A. K. Sandoval-Strausz’s recent work, Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City (Basic Books, 2019), ties together a magnificent story of Latinos migrating to Chicago and Dallas, and the positive effect immigration and cultural heritage has on urban America. Latinos are often viewed on the sidelines of... Read More
Ayelet Hoffmann Libson, “Law and Self-Knowledge in the Talmud” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Law and Self-Knowledge in the Talmud (Cambridge University Press, 2018) examines the emergence of self-knowledge as a determining legal consideration among the rabbis of Late Antiquity, from the third to the seventh centuries CE. Based on close readings of rabbinic texts from Palestine and Babylonia, Ayelet Hoffmann Libson highlights a... Read More
Julie MacArthur, “Dedan Kimathi on Trial: Colonial Justice and Popular Memory in Kenya’s Mau Mau Rebellion” (Ohio UP, 2017)
In 2015, University of Toronto professor Julie MacArthur decided to follow a couple more leads in the search for the long-missing, feared-lost transcript of the trial of legendary Mau Mau leader Dedan KImathi. She found herself amidst the papers of an anti-colonial London lawyer Ralph Millner who assisted the august... Read More
Roger Gilles, “Women on the Move: The Forgotten Era of Women’s Bicycle Racing” (U Nebraska Press, 2018)
Today we are joined by Roger Gilles, Director of the Honors College and Professor of Writing at Grand Valley State University, and author of Women on the Move: The Forgotten Era of Women’s Bicycle Racing (University of Nebraska Press, 2018).  In our conversation, we discussed the rise of women’s velodrome... Read More
Alex J. Kay and David Stahel, “Mass Violence in Nazi-Occupied Europe” (Indiana UP, 2018)
Alex J. Kay (senior lecturer in History at the University of Potsdam) and David Stahel (senior lecturer in History at the University of New South Wales in Canberra) have edited a groundbreaking series of articles on German mass killing and violence during World War II. Four years in the making,... Read More
Mario T. García, “Father Luis Olivares, A Biography: Faith Politics and the Origins of the Sanctuary Movement in Los Angeles” (UNC Press, 2018)
As the leader of the Sanctuary Movement in Los Angeles during the 1980s, Father Luis Olivares brazenly defied local Catholic authorities and the federal government by publicly offering sanctuary to Central American migrants fleeing political violence and civil war, and later extending it to undocumented Mexican immigrants unable to legalize... Read More
Megan Kate Nelson, “The Three-Cornered War: The Union, the Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West” (Scribner, 2019)
What did the American Civil War look like from Diné Bikéyah and Apacheria? This is just one of the many questions that drives historian Megan Kate Nelson’s The Three-Cornered War: The Union, The Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West (Scribner, 2020), which details the Civil War’s... Read More