New Books Network

Elizabeth S. Kassab, “Enlightenment on the Eve of Revolution: The Egyptian and Syrian Debates” (Columbia UP, 2019)
The “Arab Spring” shook the world in 2011, revealing profound dissatisfaction throughout the Middle East and North Africa, as people throughout the region took to the streets demanding dramatic political change. The uprisings have been analyzed by scholars, journalists, and other observers of the region from many angles, but the... Read More
Katie Jarvis, “Politics in the Marketplace: Work, Gender, and Citizenship in Revolutionary France” (Oxford UP, 2019)
The king’s guards became increasingly nervous as they watched nearly 7,000 individuals march on Versailles on October 5, 1789. The crowd approaching the king’s chateau was overwhelmingly composed of women who were determined to make their grievances known. Furious at the ever rising price and scarcity of bread, Parisian market... Read More
Kevin M. Levin, “Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth” (UNC Press, 2019)
Kevin M. Levin is the author of Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2019. Searching for Black Confederates investigates the claims that numerous African Americans willingly fought for the Confederacy. Investigating the Confederate Army at the time... Read More
Charles King, “Gods of the Upper Air: How A Circle of Renegade Anthropologists Reinvented Race, Sex, and Gender in the Twentieth Century” (Doubleday, 2019)
American anthropologists consider Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and Margaret Mead to be foundational figures, but outside the academy few people know the details of their ideas. In this new volume, Charles King provides a carefully-researched and beautifully-written history of the Boas Circle that everyone will enjoy reading. King covers the... Read More
Vincent DiGirolamo, “Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys (Oxford University Press, 2019) looks at the legion of children and teenagers who sold newspapers on city streets, moving trains, and even Civil War battlefields in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Author Vincent DiGirolamo, a history professor at Baruch College, is featured in this... Read More
Alma Jeftić, “Social Aspects of Memory: Stories of Victims and Perpetrators from Bosnia-Herzegovina” (Routledge, 2019)
In her new book, Social Aspects of Memory: Stories of Victims and Perpetrators from Bosnia-Herzegovina (Routledge, 2019). Alma Jeftić presents the compelling results of an empirical psychological study on how ordinary people remember war, drawing on narratives from two generations of people in Sarajevo and neighboring East Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. This... Read More
Bianca Premo, “The Enlightenment on Trial: Ordinary Litigants and Colonialism in the Spanish Empire” (Oxford UP, 2017)
Bianca Premo’s award-winning book The Enlightenment on Trial: Ordinary Litigants and Colonialism in the Spanish Empire, published by Oxford University Press in 2017, makes a powerful yet seemingly simple claim: during the eighteenth century, illiterate ordinary litigants in colonial Spanish America created enlightened ideas and practices by suing their social... Read More