New Books Network

Adam Goodman, “The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Expelling Immigrants” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Many of us know that immigrants have been deported from the United States for well over a century, but has anyone ever asked how? In The Deportation Machine: America’s Long History of Expelling Immigrants (Princeton University Press, 2020), author Adam Goodman brings together new archival evidence to write an expansive... Read More
Zena Hitz, “Lost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Do you have an active intellectual life? That is a question you may feel uncomfortable answering these days given that the very phrase “intellectual life” can strike some people as pretentious or self-indulgent, even irresponsible in a time of pandemic disease. But what better time could there be for an... Read More
Daniel Q. Gillion, “The Loud Minority: Why Protests Matter in American Democracy” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Political Scientist Daniel Q. Gillion’s new book, The Loud Minority: Why Protests Matter in American Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2020) is an incredibly topical and important analysis of the connection between protests and the influence this public activism has on the voting electorate. Tracing the idea of the “silent majority” from... Read More
Ashley Mears, “Very Important People: Status and Beauty in the Global Party Circuit” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Ashley Mears’ new book Very Important People: Status and Beauty in the Global Party Circuit (Princeton University Press, 2020) provides readers with a closer look at the global party circuit. A lifestyle that offers million-dollar birthday parties, megayachts on the French Riviera, and $40,000 bottles of champagne. In today’s New... Read More
Forrest Stuart, “Ballad of the Bullet: Gangs, Drill Music, and the Power of Online Infamy” (Princeton UP, 2020)
How do young men use drill music and social media to gain power? In his new book, Ballad of the Bullet: Gangs, Drill Music, and the Power of Online Infamy (Princeton University Press, 2020), Forrest Stuart uses ethnographic and interview methods to explore the lived experiences of young men on... Read More
Ayala Fader, “Hidden Heretics: Jewish Doubt in the Digital Age” (Princeton UP, 2020)
What would you do if you questioned your religious faith, but revealing that would cause you to lose your family and the only way of life you had ever known? Dr. Ayala Fader explores this question in Hidden Heretics: Jewish Doubt in a Digital Age––her new book with Princeton University... Read More
Yael Tamir, “Why Nationalism?” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Around the world today, nationalism is back—and it’s often deeply troubling. Populist politicians exploit nationalism for authoritarian, chauvinistic, racist, and xenophobic purposes, reinforcing the view that it is fundamentally reactionary and antidemocratic. But Yael (Yuli) Tamir makes a passionate argument for a very different kind of nationalism—one that revives its... Read More
Ünver Rüstem, “Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul” (Princeton UP, 2019)
In Istanbul, there is a mosque on every hill. Cruising along the Bosphorus, either for pleasure, or like the majority of Istanbul’s denizens, for transit, you cannot help but notice that the city’s landscape would be dramatically altered without the mosques of the city. In Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning... Read More
Abraham Newman and Henry Farrell, “Of Privacy and Power: The Transatlantic Struggle over Freedom and Security” (Princeton UP, 2019)
We live in an interconnected world. People, goods, and services leap across borders like never before. Terrorist organizations, like al-Qaida, and digital platforms, like Facebook, have gone global. But, if problems straddle different national jurisdictions, how do regulation and enforcement even happen? Of Privacy and Power: The Transatlantic Struggle over... Read More
Christopher Tomlins, “In the Matter of Nat Turner: A Speculative History” (Princeton UP, 2020)
In 1831, Nat Turner led a band of Southampton County slaves in a rebellion that killed fifty-five whites, mostly women and children. After more than two months in hiding, Turner was captured, and quickly convicted and executed. Christopher Tomlins‘ new book In the Matter of Nat Turner: A Speculative History (Princeton... Read More