New Books Network

Martin Collins, “A Telephone for the World: Motorola, Iridium, and the Making of a Global Age” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
It’s easy to take for granted that one can pick up a cell phone and call someone on the other side of the planet. But, until very recently, this had been a mere dream. Martin Collins’ A Telephone for the World: Motorola, Iridium, and the Making of a Global Age... Read More
Heike Bauer, “The Hirschfeld Archives: Violence, Death, and Modern Queer Culture” (Temple UP, 2017)
Influential sexologist and activist Magnus Hirschfeld founded Berlin’s Institute of Sexual Sciences in 1919 as a home and workplace to study homosexual rights activism and support transgender people. It was destroyed by the Nazis in 1933. This episode in history prompted Heike Bauer to ask, “Is violence an intrinsic part... Read More
Gwendoline M. Alphonso, “Polarized Families, Polarized Parties: Contesting Values and Economics in American Politics” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2018)
Gwendoline M. Alphonso‘s new book Polarized Families, Polarized Parties: Contesting Values and Economics in American Politics (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018) demonstrates how regional ideas about family in the 20th century shaped, not only Republican and Democratic policy and ideological positions concerning race and gender, but also their ideals concerning... Read More
Sandra Mendiola García, “Street Democracy: Vendors, Violence, and Public Space in Late Twentieth-Century Mexico” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
In Street Democracy: Vendors, Violence, and Public Space in Late Twentieth-Century Mexico (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), Sandra C. Mendiola García analyzes independent union activism among street vendors facing state repression and the displacing forces of neoliberalism. Set in Puebla, Mexico’s fourth largest city, Street Democracy traces how these informal... Read More
Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, “How Democracies Die” (Crown, 2018)
Daniel Ziblatt has done a lot of interviews since the release of How Democracies Die (Crown, 2018) the bestselling book he co-wrote with Steven Levitsky. But we asked him a question he’d never gotten before — about a line toward the end of the book when he refers to democracy as “grinding work.” The... Read More
Jinhua Dai (ed. Lisa Rofel), “After the Post-Cold War: The Future of Chinese History” (Duke UP, 2018)
Although not all that well known to English-speaking audiences, cultural critic and Peking University professor Jinhua Dai’s incisive commentaries and critiques of contemporary Chinese life have elevated her to something akin to ‘rock star’ status in China itself. As Lisa Rofel discusses in this podcast, and in her introduction to... Read More