New Books Network

Anastasia Denisova, “Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts” (Routledge, 2019)
How have memes changed politics? In Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts (Routledge, 2019), Anastasia Denisova, a lecturer in journalism at the University of Westminster, gives both a history of internet memes as well as an analysis of key case studies of their impact on politics and... Read More
Deborah L. Davitt, “The Gates of Never” (Finishing Line Press, 2018)
Drawing on the author’s deep knowledge of classical literature, Deborah L. Davitt’s book of poetry The Gates of Never (Finishing Line Press, 2018) explores the intersections of myth, science, and humanity through her beautifully accessible poems, reflecting a variety of forms and linguistic styles. These poems morph between being moving,... Read More
Malcolm Keating, “Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy” (Bloomsbury, 2019)
Philosophy of Language was a central concern in classical Indian Philosophy.  Philosophers in the tradition discussed testimony, pragmatics, and the religious implications of language, among other topics.  In his new book, Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy: An Introduction to Mukula’s ‘Fundamentals of the Communicative Function’ (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019),... Read More
Zahra Ayubi, “Gendered Morality: Classical Islamic Ethics of the Self, Family, and Society” (Columbia UP, 2019)
How are notions of justice and equality constructed in Islamic virtue ethics (akhlaq)? How are Islamic virtue ethics gendered, despite their venture into perennial concerns of how best to live a good and ethical life? These are the questions that Zahra Ayubi, an assistant professor of religion at Dartmouth college,... Read More
Mark Roseman, “Lives Reclaimed: A Story of Rescue and Resistance in Nazi Germany” (Metropolitan Books, 2019)
What makes some people aid the persecuted while others just stand by? Questions about rescue and resistance have been fundamental to the field of genocide studies since its inception.  Mark Roseman offers a sophisticated and deeply human exploration of this question in his new book Lives Reclaimed: A Story of... Read More
Thomas Aiello, “The Grapevine of the Black South” (U Georgia Press, 2018)
In the summer of 1928, William Alexander Scott began a small four-page weekly with the help of his brother Cornelius. By 1932 the Atlanta World had become a daily paper and the basis of Scott’s vision for a massive Southern newspaper chain – the Southern Newspaper Syndicate, later renamed as the Scott... Read More
Gabriel Jones, “Splashes” (RVB Press, 2018)
The images featured in Splashes (RVB Press, 2018) are characteristic of Gabriel Jones’ approach to making images by capturing the “backdrop”, things behind the original subject. There is a performative element to this series in that Gabriel invited friends to pretend to pose at a party, he focused his camera... Read More