New Books Network

Tim Koller, “Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies” (Wiley, 2020)
What’s a company worth? To judge by the stock market, you might think that there is little rhyme or reason to the exercise. Yet, since the beginning of commerce thousands of years ago, people have been asserting the value of enterprises. Despite that long history, the math and specific logic... Read More
Sabine Hildebrandt, “The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich” (Berghahn, 2017)
Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who remained joined the Nazi party, and some helped to develop the scientific basis for its... Read More
Luca Scholz, “Borders and Freedom of Movement in the Holy Roman Empire” (Oxford UP, 2020)
“Today we speak with Luca Scholz, a Lecturer at the University of Manchester. Dr. Scholz has varied interests: the relationship of political authority and human mobility, early modern history, and the use of geospatial and computational methods to study the past, all of which intersect in the topic of today’s... Read More
Caroline Stokes, “Elephants Before Unicorns: Emotionally Intelligent HR Strategies to Save Your Company” (Entrepreneur Press, 2019)
How does avoidance of conflict ultimately create more conflict in the workplace? Today I talked to Caroline Stokes, author of Elephants Before Unicorns: Emotionally Intelligent HR Strategies to Save Your Company (Entrepreneur Press, 2019) Stokes is the CEO of FORWARD, and the podcast host of The Emotionally Intelligent Recruiter. She... Read More
Mia Fischer, “Terrorizing Gender: Transgender Visibility and the Surveillance Practices of the U.S. Security State” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
In Terrorizing Gender: Transgender Visibility and the Surveillance Practices of the U.S. Security State (University of Nebraska Press, 2019), Mia Fischer traces how media and state actors collude in the violent disciplining of trans women, exposing the traps of visibility by illustrating that dominant representations of trans people as deceptive,... Read More
B. Fong and D. I. Spivak, “An Invitation to Applied Category Theory: Seven Sketches in Compositionality” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Category theory is well-known for abstraction—concepts and tools from diverse fields being recognized as specific cases of more foundational structures—though the field has always been driven and shaped by the needs of applications. Moreover, category theory is rarely introduced even to undergraduate math majors, despite its unifying role in theory... Read More
Robert Gerwarth, “November 1918: The German Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Was Weimar doomed from the outset? In November 1918: The German Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2020), Robert Gerwarth argues that this is the wrong question to ask. Forget 1929 and 1933, the collapse of Imperial Germany began as a velvet revolution where optimism was as common as pessimism. A masterful... Read More
Michael B. Horn, “Choosing College: How to Make Better Learning Decisions Throughout Your Life” (Jossey-Bass, 2019)
What if everything we tell each other – and ourselves – about why we choose college isn’t true?  Is higher education an ideal, a personal goal, or might it be a “job-to-be-done?” In Choosing College: How to Make Better Learning Decisions Throughout Your Life (Jossey-Bass, 2019), author Michael Horn and his... Read More
Richard M. Gergel, “Unexampled Courage” (Sarah Crichton Books, 2019)
In his new book Unexampled Courage: The Blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodard and the Awakening of President Harry S. Truman and Judge J. Waties Waring (Sarah Crichton Books, 2019), District Judge Richard M. Gergel asks pertinent questions for the Summer of 2020. How do tragic events awaken white people to the... Read More