New Books Network

Michael A. Schoeppner, “Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Between 1822 and 1857, eight Southern states barred the ingress of all free black maritime workers. According to lawmakers, they carried a ‘moral contagion’ of abolitionism and black autonomy that could be transmitted to local slaves. Those seamen who arrived in Southern ports in violation of the laws faced incarceration,... Read More
LaTanya McQueen, “And It Begins Like This” (Black Lawrence Press, 2018)
Today, I spoke with LaTanya McQueen, whose new collection of essays reckons with intriguing and timely questions about history, race, family, place, and self. It’s called And It Begins Like This (Black Lawrence Press, 2018), and I immediately found myself asking, “What’s it? What’s this?” Not until over halfway through the... Read More
Racquel J. Gates, “Double Negative: The Black Image and Popular Culture” (Duke UP, 2018)
Racquel J. Gates’ new book, Double Negative: The Black Image and Popular Culture (Duke University Press, 2018), interrogates understandings of African-American representations on screen.  This book is an important analysis of the concepts of negative and positive representations, especially in regard to the narrow space that these binary classifications create. Gates... Read More
Elena Schneider, “The Occupation of Havana: War, Trade and Slavery in the Atlantic World” (UNC Press, 2018)
Histories of the British occupation of Havana in 1762 have focused on imperial rivalries and the actions and decisions of European planters, colonial officials, and military officers. In her stunning revision, The Occupation of Havana: War, Trade and Slavery in the Atlantic World (University of North Carolina Press, 2018), Elena Schneider restores the... Read More
Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, “They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South” (Yale UP, 2019)
Bridging women’s history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. In her new book They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave Owners in the American South (Yale University Press, 2019) historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers... Read More
Joseph Vogel, “James Baldwin and the 1980s: Witnessing the Reagan Era” (U Illinois Press, 2018)
By the 1980s, critics and the public alike considered James Baldwin irrelevant. Yet Baldwin remained an important, prolific writer until his death in 1987. Indeed, his work throughout the decade pushed him into new areas, in particular an expanded interest in the social and psychological consequences of popular culture and... Read More