New Books Network

Kabria Baumgartner, “In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America” (NYU Press, 2019)
In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America (NYU Press, 2019) is an intellectual and cultural history of the educational activism of African American women and girls in the long nineteenth century. Kabria Baumgartner focuses her narrative on the actions of “African American women and girls living... Read More
Sherrow O. Pinder et al., “Black Political Thought: From David Walker to the Present” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Black Political Thought: From David Walker to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2020) is a nuanced and long-needed anthology interrogates the “never ending issue” of the unequal positioning of black Americans by combining primary documents that highlight black political ideas and ideals with incisive scholarly commentary. In words of the... Read More
Lynn M. Thomas, “Beneath the Surface: A Transnational History of Skin Lighteners” (Duke UP, 2020)
By 2024, global sales of skin lighteners are projected to reach more than $30 billion. Despite the planetary scale of its use, skin lightening remains a controversial cosmetic practice. Lynn M. Thomas’ new book, Beneath the Surface: A Transnational History of Skin Lighteners (Duke University Press, 2020), investigates what she... Read More
Paige Glotzer, “How the Suburbs Were Segregated: Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890-1960” (Columbia UP, 2020)
Paige Glotzer is the author of How the Suburbs Were Segregated: Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890-1960, published by Columbia University Press in 2020. How the Suburbs Were Segregated examines the history surrounding how modern housing segregation was purposefully planned out beginning at the turn of the 20th... Read More
Garrett Felber, “Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State” (UNC Press, 2020)
Challenging incarceration and policing was central to the post-war Black Freedom Movement. In his new book Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State (UNC Press, 2020), Garrett Felber centers the Nation in the Civil Rights Era and the making of the... Read More
H. Moore and J. Tracy, “No Fascist USA!” (City Lights, 2020)
No Fascist USA!: The John Brown Anti-Klan Committee and Lessons for Today’s Social Movements (City Lights Publishing, 2020) by Hilary Moore and James Tracy recounts the stories of fearless organizers and activists who created an anti-racist social movement that fought against the normalization of white supremacy during the 1970s and... Read More
Edward Onaci, “Free The Land: The Republic of New Afrika and the Pursuit of a Black Nation-State” (UNC Press, 2020)
On March 31, 1968, over 500 Black nationalists convened in Detroit to begin the process of securing independence from the United States. Many concluded that Black Americans’ best-remaining hope for liberation was the creation of a sovereign nation-state, the Republic of New Afrika (RNA). New Afrikan citizens traced boundaries that... Read More
Neil Roberts on How Ideas Become Books in Africana and AfroAm Studies
Where do good ideas come from? How does an idea go from creation to a research project? How is historical research done? And how does research find its way into a finished book? And what impact can a book have? Today, I discuss these topics and more with my colleague... Read More
Joshua Bennett, “Being Property Once Myself: Blackness and the End of Man” (Harvard UP, 2020) 
Throughout US history, black people have been configured as sociolegal nonpersons, a subgenre of the human. Being Property Once Myself: Blackness and the End of Man (Harvard University Press, 2020) delves into the literary imagination and ethical concerns that have emerged from this experience. Each chapter tracks a specific animal figure―the... Read More