New Books Network

Shennette Garrett-Scott, “Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance Before the New Deal” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Think running an insurance company or a bank is hard?  Try doing it as an African-American woman in the Jim Crow South.  Shennette Garrett-Scott‘s new book, Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance Before the New Deal (Columbia University Press, 2019) tells the fascinating story of just such an... Read More
Bryan McCann, “The Mark of Criminality: Rhetoric, Race, and Gangsta Rap in the War-on-Crime Era” (U Alabama Press, 2017)
On this episode, Dr. Lee Pierce (she/they)–Asst. Prof. of Communication at SUNY Geneseo–interviews Bryan McCann (he/his)–Associate Professor of Communication at Louisiana State University–on a dope new work of cultural criticism The Mark of Criminality: Rhetoric, Race, and Gangsta Rap in the War-on-Crime Era (University of Alabama Press, 2017). The Mark... Read More
Christina Proenza-Coles, “American Founders: How People of African Descent Established Freedom in the New World” (NewSouth Books, 2019)
Christina Proenza-Coles‘ new book American Founders: How People of African Descent Established Freedom in the New World (NewSouth Books, 2019) reveals men and women of African descent as key protagonists in the story of American democracy. It chronicles how black people developed and defended New World settlements, undermined slavery, and... Read More
Anne Balay, “Semi Queer: Inside the World of Gay, Trans, and Black Truck Drivers” (UNC Press, 2018)
In this multi-layered ethnography that centers truck drivers, Semi Queer: Inside the World of Gay, Trans, and Black Truck Drivers (University of North Carolina Press, 2018) describes both the long-haul trucking industry as well as the significance of truck driving for LGBTQ truck drivers and truck drivers of color. Anne... Read More
Amy Murrell Taylor, “Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps” (UNC Press, 2018)
The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more followed in... Read More
Quincy D. Newell, “Your Sister in the Gospel: The Life of Jane Manning James, a Nineteenth-Century Black Mormon” (Oxford UP, 2019)
“Dear Brother,” Jane Manning James wrote to Joseph F. Smith in 1903, “I take this opportunity of writing to ask you if I can get my endowments and also finish the work I have begun for my dead …. Your sister in the Gospel, Jane E. James.” A faithful Latter-day... Read More
Derrick Spires, “The Practice of Citizenship: Black Politics and Print Culture in the Early United States” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
With talk about birthright citizenship and border walls running rampant in Trump’s America, there are many scholars reaching back to antebellum America to historically ground today’s citizens in debates from the past that hold relevance now. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Associate Professor of English Derrick Spires is one such scholar... Read More