New Books Network

Tobie S. Stein, “Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Performing Arts Workforce” (Routledge, 2020)
How can the performing arts confront racial inequality? In Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Performing Arts Workforce (Routledge, 2020), Tobie S. Stein, Professor Emerita in the Department of Theater, Brooklyn College, CUNY, analyses the longstanding failure of America’s performing arts industry to address issues of diversity. Drawing on interviews with... Read More
Kristen Hoerl, “Bad Sixties: Hollywood Memories of the Counterculture, Antiwar, and Black Power Movements” (UP of Mississippi, 2018)
On this episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (she/they)–Asst. Prof. of Rhetoric and Communication at the State University of New York at Geneseo–interviews Kristen Hoerl (she/hers) on her impressive new book The Bad Sixties: Hollywood Memories of the Counterculture, Antiwar, and Black Power Movements (University Press of Mississippi,... Read More
Spencer Dew, “The Aliites: Race and Law in the Religions of Noble Drew Ali” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
In his dazzling new book The Aliites: Race and Law in the Religions of Noble Drew Ali (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Spencer Dew treats his readers to a riveting and often counterintuitive account of the interaction of law, race, and citizenship in the discourses of the Moorish Science Temple... Read More
Marcus P. Nevius, “City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Marronage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1763-1856” (U Georgia Press, 2020)
In his newly released book City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Marronage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1763-1856 (University of Georgia Press, 2020), Professor Marcus P. Nevius (Assistant Professor of History and Africana Studies at the University of Rhode Island) tells the interrelated histories of petit marronage, an informal slave’s... Read More
Diane Jones Allen, “Lost in the Transit Desert: Race, Transit Access, and Suburban Form” (Routledge, 2017)
Increased redevelopment, the dismantling of public housing, and increasing housing costs are forcing a shift in migration of lower income and transit dependent populations to the suburbs. These suburbs are often missing basic transportation, and strategies to address this are lacking. This absence of public transit creates barriers to viable... Read More
Great Books: John Callahan on Ellison’s “Invisible Man”
Ralph Waldo Ellison’s masterpiece Invisible Man tells the story of an African-American man who insists on his visibility, agency, and humanity in a country dead-set on not seeing him. Barring him from most opportunities, and denying his humanity. The book charts this young man’s course from the segregated South into 1950’s... Read More
Nancy P. Appelbaum, “Mapping the Country of Regions: The Chorographic Commission of Nineteenth-Century Colombia” (UNC Press, 2016)
In the mid-nineteenth century, the Chorographic Commission of Colombia, an ambitious geographical expedition, set out to define and map a nascent and still unstable republic. The commission’s purpose was to survey the land, its resources and people, and portray Colombia as a nation prone to the “wonders” of modernization. In... Read More
Paul J. Polgar, “Standard-Bearers of Equality: America’s First Abolition Movement” (UNC Press, 2019)
Paul J. Polgar is the author of Standard-Bearers of Equality: America’s First Abolition Movement, published by University of North Carolina Press in 2019. Standard-Bearers of Equality tells the story of a racially inclusive abolition movement which followed in the wake of the American Revolution. Seeking to uphold Revolutionary-era ideals, these... Read More