New Books Network

Wendy Gonaver, “The Peculiar Institution and the Making of Modern Psychiatry, 1840–1880” (UNC Press, 2019)
Dr. Wendy Gonaver discusses her book, The Peculiar Institution and the Making of Modern Psychiatry, 1840-1880 (University of North Carolina Press, 2019), the Eastern Lunatic Asylum in Virginia, and the roles that race, the institution of slavery, and slave labor played in the development of psychiatric diagnosis and care through... Read More
Dave Tell, “Remembering Emmett Till” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
On this episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (she/they)–Asst. Prof. of Rhetoric and Communication at the State University of New York at Geneseo–interviews Dr. Dave Tell (he/him/his)–Professor of Communication at The University of Kansas–on the insightful Remembering Emmett Till (University of Chicago Press, 2019) and also available... Read More
Kenneth Fones-Wolf, “Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie” (U Illinois Press, 2015)
Professor Kenneth Fones-Wolf of West Virginia University discusses his book, co-authored with Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, Struggle for the Soul of the Postwar South: White Evangelical Protestants and Operation Dixie (University of Illinois Press, 2015), the role of religion in the CIO’s Operation Dixie, and provides perspective on the participation of faith... Read More
John Shelton Reed, “Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s” (LSU Press, 2012)
John Shelton Reed, William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of sociology (emeritus) at the University of North Carolina, has been observing the South for decades. This week he and Al Zambone talk about New Orleans in the 1920s, the subject of his book Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the... Read More
Eileen Boris, “Making the Woman Worker: Precarious Labor and the Fight for Global Standards, 1919-2019” (Oxford UP, 2019)
Founded in 1919 along with the League of Nations, the International Labour Organization (ILO) establishes labor standards and produces knowledge about the world of work, serving as a forum for nations, unions, and employer associations. Before WWII, it focused on enhancing conditions for male industrial workers in Western, often imperial,... Read More
Perla Guerrero, “Nuevo South: Asians, Latinas/os, and the Remaking of Place” (U Texas Press, 2017)
Perla Guerrero is the author of Nuevo South: Asians, Latinas/os, and the Remaking of Place (University of Texas Press, 2017). Nuevo South explores the history of an ever diversifying U.S. South by examining the mixed reactions refugees, immigrants, and migrants, from different countries, received in Arkansas in the latter half... Read More
Timothy Lehman, “Up the Trail: How Texas Cowboys Herded Longhorns and Became an American Icon” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
In 1866, a sixteen year old cowboy—the name was literal in his case—named J.M. Daugherty bought 1,000 cattle, hired five cowboys, and headed north for Missouri. In Indian Territory, he took the long way around Cherokee land, to avoid paying them for crossing their lands. As Daugherty told it, some... Read More