New Books Network

Alex Lichtenstein, “Margaret Bourke-White and the Dawn of Apartheid” (Indiana UP, 2016)
Alex Lichtenstein, Associate Professor of History at Indiana University, discusses his new book with co-author Rick Halpern, Margaret Bourke-White and the Dawn of Apartheid (Indiana University Press, 2016) photojournalism, and writing transnational histories of labor and social justice movements. As a photographer for Life and Fortune magazines, Margaret Bourke-White traveled... Read More
Talitha LeFlouria, “Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South” (UNC Press, 2016)
Professor Talitha LeFlouria, a fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute at the University of Virginia, discusses her book, Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) and the lives, labors, and legacies of incarcerated black women and the convict... Read More
Katherine Rye Jewell, “Dollars for Dixie: Business and the Transformation of Conservatism in the Twentieth Century” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
Katherine Rye Jewell, Assistant Professor of History at Fitchburg State University, discusses her book, Dollars for Dixie: Business and the Transformation of Conservatism in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2017), and the evolution of political and economic conservatism in the twentieth-century South. Organized in 1933, the Southern States Industrial... Read More
Wilson Jeremiah Moses, “Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
In Greek mythology Prometheus is the trickster Titan who gives fire to humanity. As Wilson Jeremiah Moses explains in his book Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus (Cambridge University Press, 2019) America’s third president demonstrated many of the same traits as this legendary figure over the course of his long life... Read More
Matthew Hild and Keri Leigh Merritt, “Reconsidering Southern Labor History” (UP of Florida, 2018)
Matthew Hild and Keri Leigh Merritt discuss their new edited volume, Reconsidering Southern Labor History: Race, Class, and Power (University Press of Florida, 2018), the nexus of race, class and power in the history of labor in the South, and how a new generation of southern labor scholars are changing... Read More
Kathryn Holliday, “The Open-Ended City: David Dillon on Texas Architecture” (U Texas Press, 2019)
It may only be a slight exaggeration to say that one of David Dillon’s career accomplishments was to put the words “Dallas” and “architecture” in the same sentence again. After a screed in 1980 entitled “Why Is Dallas Architecture So Bad?” launched his career as an architecture critic, Dillon took... Read More
Cindy Hahamovitch, “The Fruits of Their Labor: Atlantic Coast Farmworkers and the Making of Migrant Poverty, 1870-1945” (UNC Press, 2010)
Today Professor Cindy Hahamovitch of the University of Georgia discusses her research connecting the global histories of 19th-century indentured servants and today’s guestworkers. In 1933 Congress granted American laborers the right of collective bargaining, but farmworkers got no New Deal. In The Fruits of Their Labor: Atlantic Coast Farmworkers and... Read More