New Books Network

Hannah Weiss Muller, “Subjects and Sovereign: Bonds of Belonging in the Eighteenth-Century British Empire” (Oxford UP, 2017)
There is no denying that the public remains fascinated with monarchy. In the United Kingdom, the royal family commands the headlines, but paradoxically they are distant and knowable all at once. The Queen is an iconic yet reserved figure, what with the kerchiefs, the corgis, and the deftly delivered speeches... Read More
Catherine Keyser, “Artificial Color: Modern Food and Racial Fictions” (Oxford UP, 2019)
In this this interview, Carrie Tippen talks with Catherine Keyser about early twentieth century fiction and the role that modern food plays in literature as a language for talking about race and racial categories. In Artificial Color: Modern Food and Racial Fictions, published in 2019 by Oxford University Press, Keyser... Read More
Marc Stein, “Sexual Injustice: Supreme Court Decisions from Griswold to Roe” (UNC Press, 2013)
Focusing on six major Supreme Court cases during the 1960s and 1970s, Marc Stein‘s book Sexual Injustice (University of North Carolina Press, 2010) examines the generally liberal rulings on birth control, abortion, interracial marriage, and obscenity in Griswold, Eisenstadt, Roe, Loving, and Fanny Hill alongside a profoundly conservative ruling on homosexuality in Boutilier. In the same era... Read More
David Varel, “The Lost Black Scholar: Resurrecting Allison Davis in American Social Thought” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Allison Davis (1902-1983) was a pioneering anthropologist who did ground-breaking fieldwork in the Jim Crow south,  challenged the racial bias of IQ tests, and became the first African American to be tenured at the University of Chicago. And yet despite these contributions Davis’s work is little read today. The Lost... Read More
Anthony Ryan Hatch, “Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America” (U Minnesota Press, 2019)
Over the past forty years, U.S. prisons and jails have used various psychotropic drugs. In this interview, Anthony Ryan Hatch discusses the need to think deeply about mass incarceration, pharmaceuticals, and psychiatry. He talks about the role of pharmacies and drug experiments in prison settings, and he underlines the ways... Read More
Kerry Eggers, “Jail Blazers: How the Portland Trail Blazers Became the Bad Boys of Basketball” (Sport Publishing, 2018)
In the late ’90s and early 2000s, the Portland Trail Blazers were one of the hottest teams in the NBA. For almost a decade, they won 60 percent of their games while making it to the Western Conference Finals twice. However, what happened off-court was just as unforgettable as what... Read More
Jinah Kim, “Postcolonial Grief: The Afterlives of the Pacific Wars in the Americas” (Duke UP, 2019)
In Postcolonial Grief: The Afterlives of the Pacific Wars in the Americas (Duke University Press, 2019), Jinah Kim explores questions of loss, memory, and redress in post WWII Asian diasporic decolonial politics. Through a close analysis of seminal cultural works that range from theory, short stories, film noir, documentaries, plays,... Read More