New Books Network

Lukas Rieppel, “Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a Spectacle” (Harvard UP, 2019)
After the discoveries of dinosaur fossils in the American West in the late nineteenth century, the United States became world renown for vertebrate paleontology. In his new book Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a Spectacle (Harvard University Press, 2019), Lukas Rieppel explains how the discoveries... Read More
Monica Muñoz Martinez, “The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas” (Harvard UP, 2018)
On January 28, 1918, just outside of town of Porvenir, Texas, US Army servicemen, Texas Rangers, and civilians murdered 15 unarmed Mexican men and boys. This massacre was not an aberration, writes Monica Muñoz Martinez, the Stanley J. Bernstein Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies at Brown University... Read More
Andrew Torget, “Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850” (UNC Press, 2015)
The secession of Texas from Mexico was a dry run for the slaveholder’s republic of the Confederate States of America, argues Andrew Torget in Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850 (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Torget, the University Distinguished Teaching Professor of... Read More
Elaine Hampton and Cynthia Ontiveros, “Copper Stain: ASARCO’s Legacy in El Paso” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
In Copper Stain: ASARCO’s Legacy in El Paso (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019), Elaine Hampton and Cynthia Ontiveros tell the story of how a Mexican American community in El Paso have fought back against environmental injustice. The physical and social legacy of the ASARCO smelter are told through the testimonies... Read More
Laura Alice Watt, “The Paradox of Preservation: Wilderness and Working Landscapes at Point Reyes National Seashore” (U California Press, 2016)
“Wilderness,” “nature,” and their “preservation” are concepts basic to how the National Park Service organizes our relationship to American land. They are also contested concepts, geographer and environmental historian Laura Alice Watt shows in The Paradox of Preservation: Wilderness and Working Landscapes at Point Reyes National Seashore (University of California... Read More
Douglas Sheflin, “Legacies of Dust: Land Use and Labor on the Colorado Plains” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
The “Dust Bowl” remains a mainstay in American history textbooks. When dust storms swept over the southern plains in the 1930s, they upended farming communities and left thousands of migrants in search of brighter horizons in the “Dirty Thirties.” The historian Douglas Sheflin takes a closer look at the Dust... Read More
Melvin C. Johnson, “Life and Times of John Pierce Hawley: A Mormon Ulysses of the American West” (Greg Kofford Books, 2019)
Life and Times of John Pierce Hawley: A Mormon Ulysses of the American West (Greg Kofford Books, 2019) narrates the wide-ranging life of John Hawley’s search for an authentic Mormon faith. Melvin C. Johnson has been researching Hawley’s adventurous life along the American borderlands and frontier for three decades. Hawley was... Read More