New Books Network

Nick Estes, “Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline” (Verso, 2019)
The historian Nick Estes traces two centuries of Indigenous-led resistance and anti-colonial struggle. Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019) moves from settler colonialism and Indian Wars to the front lines of indigenous climate activism today.... Read More
Heather Mayer, “Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924” (Oregon State UP, 2018)
The Pacific Northwest was a hotbed of labor radicalism in the early twentieth century, where the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World (commonly known as the “Wobblies”) fought for better working conditions for all workers regardless of race, sex, or creed. The historian Heather Mayer takes a new look at... Read More
Peter Guardino, “The Dead March: A History of the Mexican-American War” (Harvard UP, 2017)
The Mexican-American War was one of the pivotal moments in 19th-century American history. It bridged the Jacksonian period and the Civil War era and was a highly controversial and politically partisan conflict, the first American war to result in significant land acquisition for the young nation. In The Dead March:... Read More
Noam Maggor, “Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age” (Harvard UP, 2017)
Tracking the movement of finance capital toward far-flung investment frontiers, Noam Maggor, Lecturer at Queen Mary University of London, re-conceives the emergence of modern capitalism in the United States. Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age (Harvard University Press, 2017) reveals the decisive role of established wealth... Read More
Rosalyn LaPier, “Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet” (U Nebraska Press, 2017)
In Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers, and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet (University of Nebraska Press, 2017), author Rosalyn LaPier, an associate professor in environmental studies at the University of Montana, complicates several narratives about Native people and the nonhuman world. Rather than “living in harmony with nature,” as stereotyped... Read More
Jacob Lee, “Masters of the Middle Waters: Indian Nations and Colonial Ambitions Along the Mississippi” (Harvard UP, 2019)
America’s waterways were once the superhighways of travel and communication. Coursing through a central line across the landscape, with tributaries connecting the South to the Great Plains and the Great Lakes, the Mississippi River meant wealth, knowledge, and power for those who could master it. In Masters of the Middle... Read More
Kristin L. Hoganson, “The Heartland: An American History” (Penguin, 2019)
The Great West. Middle America. Flyover Country. The expanse of plains, lakes, forests, and farms, between the Appalachian and Rocky Mountains has carried many names. Beginning in the twentieth century, Americans began calling it The Heartland, a term that Dr. Kristin L. Hoganson argues carried a specific meaning that has... Read More