New Books Network

Lincoln A. Mitchell, “San Francisco Year Zero” (Rutgers UP, 2019)
1978 was the year that changed San Francisco forever, writes Lincoln A. Mitchell in San Francisco Year Zero: Political Upheaval, Punk Rock and a Third-Place Baseball Team (Rutgers University Press, 2019). After the long hangover from the heady 1960s and summer of love, San Francisco was, by the late ‘70s,... Read More
Roland De Wolk, “American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford” (U California Press, 2019)
With a name associated with the famous university in Palo Alto, Leland Stanford is among the best-known of the famous “robber barons” of the 19th century. Yet as Roland De Wolk explains in American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford (University of California Press, 2019), much of his fascinating... Read More
Serin D. Houston, “Imagining Seattle: Social Values in Urban Governance” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
In Imagining Seattle: Social Values in Urban Governance (University of Nebraska Press, 2019), the geographer Serin Houston complicates Seattle’s liberal and progressive reputation through a close ethnographic study of its urban governance. She sheds light on the institutional classism and racism and market-orientated thinking that pervades the decisions and practices... Read More
Thaisa Way, “The Landscape Architecture of Richard Haag: From Modern Space to Urban Ecological Design” (U Washington Press, 2019)
Today I talked to Thaïsa Way about her new book, The Landscape Architecture of Richard Haag: From Modern Space to Urban Ecological Design (University of Washington Press, 2019). Haag is best known for his rehabilitation of Gas Works Park in Seattle and for a series of remarkable gardens at the Bloedel... Read More
Timothy Lehman, “Up the Trail: How Texas Cowboys Herded Longhorns and Became an American Icon” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
In 1866, a sixteen year old cowboy—the name was literal in his case—named J.M. Daugherty bought 1,000 cattle, hired five cowboys, and headed north for Missouri. In Indian Territory, he took the long way around Cherokee land, to avoid paying them for crossing their lands. As Daugherty told it, some... Read More
Jon K. Lauck, “The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History” (U Iowa Press, 2013)
The guest this week on Historically Thinking is Jon Lauck. He’s the author of The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History (University of Iowa Press, 2013), which is several things at once: a brief illustration of the importance of the Midwest to both American and World History; the history... Read More
David D. Vail, “Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945” (U Alabama Press, 2018)
Over fifty years ago, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (1962) scolded the agricultural industry for its profligate spread of “poison” and pesticides “indiscriminately from the skies.” Now, in Chemical Lands: Pesticides, Aerial Spraying, and Health in North America’s Grasslands since 1945 (University of Alabama Press, 2018), David D. Vail re-examines aerial... Read More