New Books Network

Kathryn E. O’Rourke, “O’Neil Ford on Architecture” (U Texas Press, 2019)
O’Neil Ford on Architecture (University of Texas Press, 2019) brings together Ford’s major professional writings and speeches for the first time. Revealing the intellectual and theoretical underpinnings of his distinctive modernism, they illuminate his fascination with architectural history, his pioneering uses of new technologies and construction systems, his deep concerns... Read More
Nancy Langston, “Sustaining Lake Superior: An Extraordinary Lake in a Changing World” (Yale UP, 2017)
When people today visit or imagine Lake Superior, the largest freshwater lake in the world, they often perceive a cold, remote, and pristine body of water, relatively untouched by industrialization. Yet, Lake Superior has experienced substantial environmental change—including today’s impressive but incomplete ecological recovery—in its existence, especially over the last... Read More
Erik Loomis, “Empire of Timber: Labor Unions and the Pacific Northwest Forests” (Cambridge UP, 2015)
In Empire of Timber: Labor Unions and the Pacific Northwest Forests (Cambridge University Press, 2015), the historian Erik Loomis examines the relationship between workers and their environments in this century-long history of timber workers in the Pacific Northwest. He shows that the “jobs vs. environment” tradeoff oversimplifies the history of... Read More
David M. Wrobel, “America’s West: A History, 1890-1950” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
In America’s West: A History, 1890-1950 (Cambridge University Press, 2017), David M. Wrobel describes a sixty year period of remarkable change for the vast region. By focusing on politics, demography, race, and cultural change, Wrobel argues that while the West was colonized space, it was also a crucible for the broader... Read More
Lukas Rieppel, “Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a Spectacle” (Harvard UP, 2019)
After the discoveries of dinosaur fossils in the American West in the late nineteenth century, the United States became world renown for vertebrate paleontology. In his new book Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a Spectacle (Harvard University Press, 2019), Lukas Rieppel explains how the discoveries... Read More
Monica Muñoz Martinez, “The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas” (Harvard UP, 2018)
On January 28, 1918, just outside of town of Porvenir, Texas, US Army servicemen, Texas Rangers, and civilians murdered 15 unarmed Mexican men and boys. This massacre was not an aberration, writes Monica Muñoz Martinez, the Stanley J. Bernstein Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies at Brown University... Read More
Andrew Torget, “Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850” (UNC Press, 2015)
The secession of Texas from Mexico was a dry run for the slaveholder’s republic of the Confederate States of America, argues Andrew Torget in Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850 (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Torget, the University Distinguished Teaching Professor of... Read More