New Books Network

Maile Arvin, “Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai‘i and Oceania” (Duke UP, 2020)
From their earliest encounters with Indigenous Pacific Islanders, white Europeans and Americans saw Polynesians as almost racially white, and speculated that they were of Mediterranean or Aryan descent. In Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai‘i and Oceania (Duke University Press, 2020) Maile Arvin argues that a... Read More
Matt Tomlinson, “God is Samoan: Dialogues Between Culture and Theology in the Pacific” (U Hawai‘i Press, 2020)
Christian theologians in the Pacific Islands see culture as the grounds on which one understands God. In God is Samoan: Dialogues Between Culture and Theology in the Pacific (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2020), Matt Tomlinson engages in an anthropological conversation with the work of “contextual theologians,” exploring how the combination of... Read More
Imre Salusinszky, “The Hilton Bombing: Evan Pederick and the Ananda Marga” (Melbourne UP, 2019)
“Every morning of my life in the past few years I would wake with the thought, I’m a murderer. I have no right to enjoy life.” Evan Pederick speaking to psychiatrist William Barclay in prison about what lead him to confess to the Hilton bombing. In 1978, Evan Pederick, a... Read More
Arlie Loughnan, “Self, Others and the State: Relations of Criminal Responsibility” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Criminal responsibility is a key-organizing concept of the criminal law, but Arlie Loughnan argues that it needs re-examination. Focusing on the Australian experience, Self, Others and the State: Relations of Criminal Responsibility (Cambridge University Press, 2020) questions assumptions about the rise and prominence of criminal responsibility from the late colonial... Read More
Chris Fleming, “On Drugs” (Giramondo Publishing, 2019)
“After I’d finished my rapid-fire history of self-justification he paused and then said, deadpan and rural-Australian-slow: ‘Right. Ok. So how is that all working out for you?'” On Drugs (Giramondo Publishing, 2019) explores Australian philosopher Chris Fleming’s experience of addiction, which begins when he is a student at the University... Read More
Chelsea McCracken, “A Grammar of Belep” (Walter de Gruyter, 2019)
Chelsea McCracken talks about her new book A Grammar of Belep (Walter de Gruyter, 2019). McCracken is Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at Dixie State University and Senior Research Analyst of the Coalition for Responsible Home Education. She became involved in the homeschool reform movement as a result... Read More
Jon Piccini, “Human Rights in Twentieth-Century Australia” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
After the Second World War, an Australian diplomat was one of eight people to draft the U.N. Declaration of Human Rights. And in the years that followed, Australians of many different stripes—including activists fighting for Aboriginal rights and women’s rights, communists, and even anticommunists—invoked human rights in their respective political... Read More
Jeremy Yellen, “The Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere: When Total Empire Met Total War” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Jeremy Yellen’s The Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere: When Total Empire Met Total War (Cornell University Press, 2019) is a challenging transnational exploration of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, Japan’s ambitious, confused, and much maligned attempt to create a new bloc order in East and Southeast Asia during World... Read More
Trevor Thompson, “Playing for Australia: The First Socceroos, Asia, and World Football” (Fair Play, 2018)
Today we are joined by Trevor Thompson, a journalist who has reported on association football in Australia and around the world since the 1980s. He is also the author of Playing for Australia: The First Socceroos, Asia, and World Football (Fair Play Publishing, 2018). In our conversation, we discussed the... Read More