New Books Network

Rachel B. Herrmann, “No Useless Mouth: Waging War and Fighting Hunger in the American Revolution” (Cornell UP, 2019)
When the British explored the Atlantic coast of America in the 1580s, their relations with indigenous peoples were structured by food. The newcomers, unable to sustain themselves through agriculture, relied on the local Algonquian people for resources. This led to tension, and then violence. When English raiding parties struck Algonquian... Read More
Tita Chico, “The Experimental Imagination: Literary Knowledge and Science in the British Enlightenment” (Stanford UP, 2018)
Can science be seductive? According to Tita Chico, the answer is a resounding yes. In her new book, The Experimental Imagination: Literary Knowledge and Science in the British Enlightenment (Stanford University Press, 2018), Dr. Chico’s new book upends the traditional, modern dichotomies which enforce strict separations between literature and science.... Read More
Hannah Weiss Muller, “Subjects and Sovereign: Bonds of Belonging in the Eighteenth-Century British Empire” (Oxford UP, 2017)
There is no denying that the public remains fascinated with monarchy. In the United Kingdom, the royal family commands the headlines, but paradoxically they are distant and knowable all at once. The Queen is an iconic yet reserved figure, what with the kerchiefs, the corgis, and the deftly delivered speeches... Read More
Sasha D. Pack, “The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border” (Stanford UP, 2019)
In his new book, The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border (Stanford, 2019), Sasha D. Pack considers the Strait of Gibraltar as an untamed in-between space—from “shatter zone” to borderland. Far from the centers of authority of contending empires, the North African and... Read More
Tim Bouverie, “Appeasement: Chamberlain, Hitler, Churchill and the Road to War” (Tim Duggan Books, 2019)
Appeasement: Chamberlain, Hitler, Churchill and the Road to War (Tim Duggan Books, 2019) is a groundbreaking history of the disastrous years of indecision, failed diplomacy and parliamentary infighting that help to make Hitler’s domination of Europe possible. Drawing on the available archival research, Oxford graduate, professional writer and one-time Channel... Read More
Kimberly Alexander, “Treasures Afoot: Shoe Stories from the Georgian Era” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2018)
“Fashion is universal,” writes my guest Kimberly Alexander in her book Treasures Afoot: Shoe Stories from the Georgian Era (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018), “enabling historians across time, place, and culture to form an understanding of the people who made clothes and who wore them. But shoes are different. As... Read More
Edward Vallance, “Loyalty, Memory and Public Opinion in England, 1658-1727” (Manchester UP, 2019)
People value loyalty. We prize it in our dogs. We loyally carry loyalty cards to claim discounts at our favourite stores and coffee shops. We follow sports teams, even when they lose. Loyalty is also deeply political. It is signified in oaths of office, in pledges of allegiance, and in... Read More