New Books Network

Jeremy Black, “The World of James Bond: The Lives and Times of 007” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017)
This book by renowned Professor of History Jeremy Black presents an insightful and hugely entertaining exploration of the political and cultural context of the Bond books and films in the book. In The World of James Bond: The Lives and Times of 007 (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017), Jeremy Black offers... Read More
Philip A. Craig, “The Bond of Grace and Duty in the Soteriology of John Owen” (Founders Press, 2020) 
Philip A. Craig’s new book on John Owen, the premier puritan theologian, demonstrates how carefully his subject tracked the influence of antinomianism in his writing. Craig’s book roots Owen’s ideas of conversion in Augustine and Calvin. The Bond of Grace and Duty in the Soteriology of John Owen (Founders Press,... Read More
Joy White, “Terraformed: Young Black Lives in the Inner City” (Repeater Books, 2020)
How are black lives lived in the contemporary city? In Terraformed: Young Black Lives in the Inner City (Repeater Books, 2020), Dr. Joy White, a sociologist and ethnographer based in London, explores the case study of Newham in East London to illustrate issues of privatisation, gentrification, policing, and racial discrimination. In... Read More
Jóhanna Katrín Friðriksdóttir, “Valkyrie: The Women of the Viking World” (Bloomsbury, 2020)
Fascination with the Viking Age seems to be at an all-time high, though it has never really gone out of fashion. There is something irresistible about the Vikings, a civilization dedicated to exploring the edges of the known world, forging an empire from north America to Kiev, which dominated the... Read More
Kenneth Womack, “Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and The End of The Beatles” (Cornell UP, 2019)
To what degree did each of The Beatles exhibit emotional intelligence in the band’s final year? You’ll find out in the discussion I had with Kenneth Womack about his new book Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and The End of The Beatles (Cornell University Press, 2019). Womack is... Read More
Amy Harris, “Siblinghood and Social Relations in Georgian England: Share and Share Alike” (Manchester UP, 2016)
Siblinghood and Social Relations in Georgian England: Share and Share Alike (Manchester University Press, 2016), by Amy Harris, examines the impact sisters and brothers had on eighteenth-century English families and society. Using evidence from letters, diaries, probate disputes, court transcripts, prescriptive literature and portraiture, Harris argues that although parents’ wills... Read More
Michael Braddick, “The Common Freedom of the People: John Lilburne and the English Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2018)
As historical topics, political revolutions come in and out of fashion. At the moment the American Revolution as an ideological struggle engages the public, but historians are less sure. Books that used to have the Revolution at their centre now approach it from the edges and peripheries, integrating the experiences... Read More
Coryne Hall, “Queen Victoria and the Romanovs: 60 Years of Mutual Distrust” (Amberley, 2020)
The balance of power in nineteenth-century Europe was anchored on one end by the redoubtable Queen Victoria (1819 -1901), the doyenne of sovereigns, and at the opposite end by the autocratic Romanov dynasty — four successive emperors who ruled Russia during Victoria’s own 63-year reign. Between these great powers lay... Read More
Manuel Barcia, “The Yellow Demon of Fever: Fighting Disease in the 19th-Century Transatlantic Slave Trade” (Yale UP, 2020)
As we now know, epidemics and pandemics are not new phenomena. In her new book The Yellow Demon of Fever: Fighting Disease in the 19th-Century Transatlantic Slave Trade (Yale University Press, 2020), Manuel Barcia offers a striking rendition of the diseases that swept through the illegal slave trade Atlantic World. In... Read More