New Books Network

Veronica Hinke, “The Last Night on the Titanic: Unsinkable Drinking, Dining, and Style” (Regnery History, 2019)
Fascination with The Titanic has not faded, though more than 105 years have passed since its tragic sinking when so many lives were lost, and an era of gilded glamor ended. Culinary historian Veronica Hinke’s new book, The Last Night on the Titanic: Unsinkable Drinking, Dining, and Style (Regnery History,... Read More
Ryan Hanley, “Beyond Slavery and Abolition: Black British Writing, c. 1770 -1830” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
To our eyes, eighteenth-century Britain can look like a world of opposites. On one hand everything was new: political parties and a ‘prime’ minister emerged in parliament; their sometime unruly debates were recorded by an expanding political press, whose products were read and debated in London’s many coffee houses. The... Read More
James Crossland, “War, Law and Humanity: The Campaign to Control Warfare, 1853-1914” (Bloomsbury, 2018)
Beginning in the mid-1850s, a number of people in Europe and the United States undertook a range of efforts in response to the horrors of war. In his book War, Law and Humanity: The Campaign to Control Warfare, 1853-1914 (Bloomsbury, 2018) James Crossland describes the emergence of various movements in... Read More
Adrian Goldsworthy, “Hadrian’s Wall” (Basic Books, 2018)
Stretching across the north of England, from coast to coast, are the 73-mile long remnants of a fortification built by the Roman Army during the reign of the Emperor Hadrian. It is, as our guest Adrian Goldsworthy has written, “the largest of the many monuments left by the Roman Empire... Read More
Guy Beiner, “Forgetful Remembrance: Social Forgetting and Vernacular Historiography of a Rebellion in Ulster” (Oxford UP, 2018)
Guy Beiner, who is professor of modern history at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, has written one of the longest and certainly one of the most extraordinary recent contributions to the historiography of Ireland and of memory studies. His new book, Forgetful Remembrance: Social Forgetting and Vernacular Historiography of... Read More
David Woodbridge, “Missionary Primitivism and Chinese Modernity: The Brethren in Twentieth-Century China” (Brill, 2019)
Drawing on new archival resources, and opening up an entirely new research agenda in the field, David Woodbridge has written an outstanding new book. Missionary Primitivism and Chinese Modernity: The Brethren in Twentieth-Century China (Brill, 2019) focuses on a small but very significant evangelical community, the so-called Plymouth Brethren, and... Read More
Max Edelson, “The New Map of Empire: How Britain Imagined America before Independence” (Harvard UP, 2017)
When we think of the history of the British Empire we tend to think big: oceans were crossed; colonies grew from small settlements to territories many times larger than England; entire Continents, each with substantial indigenous populations, were brought under British rule. Maps were an important part of rule in... Read More