New Books Network

Kate Imy, “Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army” (Stanford UP, 2019)
In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of twentieth century British India. How were preconceived British imperial notions of religion and... Read More
Sir John Redwood, “We Don’t Believe You: Why Populists and the Establishment See the World Differently” (Bite-Sized Books, 2019)
In We Don’t Believe You: Why Populists and the Establishment See the World Differently (Bite-Sized Book, 2019), Sir John Redwood gives us fresh insights into why the populist movements and parties have been winning elections. He looks at how the experts and narrative pushed out by the established elites on... Read More
Ezequiel Mercau, “The Falklands War: An Imperial History” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
The Falklands War was in many ways the defining event in the premiership of Margaret Thatcher. In many ways it was also the last roar of the British Lion. An event shrouded in both nostalgia and patriotism, at the time and subsequently. In his book, The Falklands War: An Imperial... Read More
Great Books: Julie Carlson on Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”
Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley wrote Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus when she was nineteen years old, on a bet. The novel spawned two centuries of creatures that turn against their makers. It examines the limits of scientific innovation, whether the quest for knowledge must be tempered by morality, and why... Read More
Christopher J. Lee, “Unreasonable Histories: Nativism, Multiracial Lives, and the Genealogical Imagination in British Africa” (Duke UP, 2014)
In Unreasonable Histories: Nativism, Multiracial Lives, and the Genealogical Imagination in British Africa (Duke University Press, 2014), Christopher J. Lee recovers the forgotten experiences of multiracial peoples in the British colonies of Nyasaland, Southern and Northern Rhodesia. By carefully reading fragmented correspondence, colonial reports, periodicals and oral testimonies, the author... Read More
Jonathan Scott, “How the Old World Ended: The Anglo-Dutch-American Revolution, 1500-1800” (Yale UP, 2019)
Jonathan Scott is one of the most original interpreters of the early modern world. How the Old World Ended: The Anglo-Dutch-American Revolution, 1500-1800 (Yale University Press, 2019) is a deft and cogent synthesis in which Scott returns to the turbulent seventeenth century in Britain, and examines how a period of political... Read More
Mathias Haeussler, “Helmut Schmidt and British-German Relations: A European Misunderstanding” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
The former West German chancellor Helmut Schmidt grew up as a devout Anglophile, yet he clashed heavily and repeatedly with his British counterparts Wilson, Callaghan, and Thatcher during his time in office between 1974 and 1982. Helmut Schmidt and British-German Relations: A European Misunderstanding (Cambridge University Press, 2019) looks at... Read More
Elizabeth Goldring, “Nicholas Hilliard: Life of an Artist” (Yale UP, 2019)
Limning – the painting of miniature portraits – was an important art form in 16th-century Europe. Among its greatest practitioners was Nicholas Hilliard, who enjoyed an international reputation for his skill in crafting the finely wrought images. In Nicholas Hilliard: Life of an Artist (Yale University Press, 2019), Elizabeth Goldring... Read More
Jamie L. H. Goodall, “Pirates of the Chesapeake Bay: From the Colonial Era to the Oyster Wars” (The History Press, 2020)
The story of Chesapeake pirates and patriots begins with a land dispute and ends with the untimely death of an oyster dredger at the hands of the Maryland Oyster Navy. From the golden age of piracy to Confederate privateers and oyster pirates, the maritime communities of the Chesapeake Bay are... Read More