New Books Network

Christopher Lupke (trans.), “A History of Taiwan Literature” (Cambria Press, 2020)
Ye Shitao was a Taiwanese public intellectual who rose to prominence in the second half of the twentieth century. His encyclopedic A History of Taiwan Literature was published in 1987, the same year that the island’s decades-long period of martial law came to an end. The book provides a thorough... Read More
Alan Chong, “Critical Reflections on China’s Belt and Road Initiative” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020)
Political scientists Alan Chong and Quang Min Pham bring with their edited volume, Critical Reflections on China’s Belt and Road Initiative (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020), originality as well as dimensions and perspectives to the discussion about the Belt and Road that are highly relevant but often either unrecognized or underemphasized. The book... Read More
C. Chan and F. de Londras, “China’s National Security: Endangering Hong Kong’s Rule of Law?” (Hart, 2020)
On July 1, 2020, China introduced a National Security Law into Hong Kong partly in an attempt to quell months of civil unrest, as a mechanism to safeguard China’s security. In this new book, China’s National Security: Endangering Hong Kong’s Rule of Law? (Hart, 2020), Cora Chan and Fiona de... Read More
Karl Gerth, “Unending Capitalism: How Consumerism Negated China’s Communist Revolution” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Karl Gerth’s new book, Unending Capitalism: How Consumerism Negated China’s Communist Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2020) details how the state created brands, promoted and advertised particular products, set up department stores, and facilitated the promotion of certain luxury consumer products (notably wristwatches, bicycles, and sewing machines)—all in the Mao era. Though... Read More
Brian R. Dott, “The Chile Pepper in China: A Cultural Biography” (Columbia UP, 2020)
In China, chiles are everywhere. From dried peppers hanging from eaves to Mao’s boast that revolution would be impossible without chiles, Chinese culture and the chile pepper have been intertwined for centuries. Yet, this was not always the case. In The Chile Pepper in China: A Cultural Biography (Columbia University... Read More
Sean Roberts, “The War on the Uyghurs: China’s Internal Campaign against a Muslim Minority” (Princeton UP, 2020)
In today’s new episode, we speak with Sean Roberts about his brand new book The War on the Uyghurs: China’s Internal Campaign against a Muslim Minority (Princeton University Press, 2020). Roberts is the Director of the International Development Studies program at George Washington University. He received his PhD in Cultural Anthropology... Read More
Mary Augusta Brazelton, “Mass Vaccination: Citizens’ Bodies and State Power in Modern China” (Cornell UP, 2019)
While the eradication of smallpox has long been documented, not many know the Chinese roots of this historic achievement. In this revelatory study, Mass Vaccination. Citizens’ Bodies and State Power in Modern China (Cornell University Press), Mary Augusta Brazelton examines the PRC’s public health campaigns of the 1950s to explain... Read More
Philip Thai, “China’s War on Smuggling: Law, Illicit Markets, and State Power on the China Coast” (Columbia UP, 2018)
In this episode, Siobhan talks with Philip Thai about his book, China’s War on Smuggling: Law, Illicit Markets, and State Power on the China Coast (Columbia University Press, 2018). Thai is Assistant Professor of History at Northeastern University. He is a historian of Modern China with research and teaching interests that... Read More
Xiaoqiao Ling, “Feeling the Past in Seventeenth-Century China” (Harvard Asia Center, 2019)
As much of the world’s population is currently discovering, living through a historical cataclysm is a more common fact of human existence than one might think. Perhaps one reason why this is easily forgotten is the fact that it is hard to make the empathetic leap between oneself and other... Read More
Ting Zhang, “Circulating the Code: Print Media and Legal Knowledge in Qing China” (U Washington Press, 2020)
How could a peasant in Shandong in the Qing dynasty come to know enough about a specific law that he felt confident enough to kill his own wife and his lover’s husband and think that he could get away with it? As Ting Zhang’s new book, Circulating the Code: Print... Read More