New Books Network

Ann-elise Lewallen, “The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity, Gender, and Settler Colonialism in Japan” (U New Mexico Press, 2016)
The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity, Gender, and Settler Colonialism in Japan (University of New Mexico Press) is a recent addition to the growing scholarship on Ainu identity and settler colonialism in Japan. Combining ethnographic fieldwork in contemporary Ainu communities and organizations with museum and archival research, Dr. Lewallen shows... Read More
Sean Roberts, “The War on the Uyghurs: China’s Internal Campaign against a Muslim Minority” (Princeton UP, 2020)
In today’s new episode, we speak with Sean Roberts about his brand new book The War on the Uyghurs: China’s Internal Campaign against a Muslim Minority (Princeton University Press, 2020). Roberts is the Director of the International Development Studies program at George Washington University. He received his PhD in Cultural Anthropology... Read More
Steven Heine, “Readings of Dōgen’s ‘Treasury of the True Dharma Eye'”(Columbia UP, 2020)
The Treasury of the True Dharma Eye (Shōbōgenzō) is the masterwork of Dōgen (1200–1253), founder of the Sōtō Zen Buddhist sect in Kamakura-era Japan. It is one of the most important Zen Buddhist collections, composed during a period of remarkable religious diversity and experimentation. The text is complex and compelling, famed for... Read More
Sören Urbansky, “Beyond the Steppe Frontier: A History of the Sino-Russian Border” (Princeton UP, 2020)
The fact that the vast border between China and Russia is often overlooked goes hand-in-hand with a lack of understanding of the ordinary citizens in these much-discussed places, who often lose out to larger-than-life figures like Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping. A book that combines a look at the history... Read More
Harriet Evans, “Beijing from Below: Stories of Marginal Lives in the Capital’s Center” (Duke UP, 2020)
Between the early 1950s and the accelerated demolition and construction of Beijing’s “old city” in preparation for the 2008 Olympics, the residents of Dashalar—one of the capital city’s poorest neighborhoods and only a stone’s throw from Tian’anmen Square—lived in dilapidated conditions without sanitation. Few had stable employment. Today, most of... Read More
Mary Augusta Brazelton, “Mass Vaccination: Citizens’ Bodies and State Power in Modern China” (Cornell UP, 2019)
While the eradication of smallpox has long been documented, not many know the Chinese roots of this historic achievement. In this revelatory study, Mass Vaccination. Citizens’ Bodies and State Power in Modern China (Cornell University Press), Mary Augusta Brazelton examines the PRC’s public health campaigns of the 1950s to explain... Read More
Adam Broinowski, “Cultural Responses to Occupation in Japan: The Performing Body During and After the Cold War” (Bloomsbury 2016)
In Cultural Responses to Occupation in Japan: The Performing Body During and After the Cold War (Bloomsbury 2016), Adam Broinowski analyzes the emergence of Ankoku Butoh (dance of darkness) in the context of America’s de jure and then de facto occupation of Japan following the Second World War. Broinowski traces... Read More
Philip Thai, “China’s War on Smuggling: Law, Illicit Markets, and State Power on the China Coast” (Columbia UP, 2018)
In this episode, Siobhan talks with Philip Thai about his book, China’s War on Smuggling: Law, Illicit Markets, and State Power on the China Coast (Columbia University Press, 2018). Thai is Assistant Professor of History at Northeastern University. He is a historian of Modern China with research and teaching interests that... Read More
Xiaoqiao Ling, “Feeling the Past in Seventeenth-Century China” (Harvard Asia Center, 2019)
As much of the world’s population is currently discovering, living through a historical cataclysm is a more common fact of human existence than one might think. Perhaps one reason why this is easily forgotten is the fact that it is hard to make the empathetic leap between oneself and other... Read More
David G. Atwill, “Islamic Shangri-La: Inter-Asian Relations and Lhasa’s Muslim Communities, 1600 to 1960” (U California Press 2018)
Centering on the Tibetan Muslims (the Khache) from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century, Islamic Shangri-La: Inter-Asian Relations and Lhasa’s Muslim Communities, 1600 to 1960 (University of California Press, 2018) questions the popular portrayals of Tibet as isolated, ethnically homogenous, and monolithically Buddhist. Revealing in this monograph previously inaccessible... Read More