New Books Network

Sasha D. Pack, “The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border” (Stanford UP, 2019)
In his new book, The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Hispano-African Border (Stanford, 2019), Sasha D. Pack considers the Strait of Gibraltar as an untamed in-between space—from “shatter zone” to borderland. Far from the centers of authority of contending empires, the North African and... Read More
Caitlyn Collins, “Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving” (Princeton UP, 2019)
Where in the world do working moms have it best? In her new book, Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving (Princeton University Press, 2019), Caitlyn Collins explores how women balance motherhood and work across the globe. Using interviews with middle class working mothers in Sweden, East and... Read More
Daniel Nemser, “Infrastructures of Race: Concentration and Biopolitics in Colonial Mexico” (U Texas Press, 2017)
Daniel Nemser’s Infrastructures of Race: Concentration and Biopolitics in Colonial Mexico (University of Texas Press, 2017) examines the long history of how Spanish imperial rule depended upon spatial concentration – the gathering of people and things into centralized spaces – to control populations and consolidate power. Through four case studies... Read More
Tim Bouverie, “Appeasement: Chamberlain, Hitler, Churchill and the Road to War” (Tim Duggan Books, 2019)
Appeasement: Chamberlain, Hitler, Churchill and the Road to War (Tim Duggan Books, 2019) is a groundbreaking history of the disastrous years of indecision, failed diplomacy and parliamentary infighting that help to make Hitler’s domination of Europe possible. Drawing on the available archival research, Oxford graduate, professional writer and one-time Channel... Read More
Jeffrey T. Zalar, “Reading and Rebellion in Catholic Germany, 1770-1914” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Popular conceptions of Catholic censorship, symbolized above all by the Index of Forbidden Books, figure prominently in secular definitions of freedom. To be intellectually free is to enjoy access to knowledge unimpeded by any religious authority. But how would the history of freedom change if these conceptions were false? In... Read More
Edward Vallance, “Loyalty, Memory and Public Opinion in England, 1658-1727” (Manchester UP, 2019)
People value loyalty. We prize it in our dogs. We loyally carry loyalty cards to claim discounts at our favourite stores and coffee shops. We follow sports teams, even when they lose. Loyalty is also deeply political. It is signified in oaths of office, in pledges of allegiance, and in... Read More
Carolyn J. Dean, “The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide” (Cornell UP, 2019)
Carolyn J. Dean’s The Moral Witness: Trials and Testimony after Genocide (Cornell University Press, 2019) examines the cultural history of the idea of the “witness to genocide” in Western Europe and the United States.  She portrays the witness in non-traditional genocide court trials as the moral compass.  In fact, many... Read More