New Books Network

Frederick Beiser, “Hermann Cohen: An Intellectual Biography” (Oxford UP, 2018)
The eminent scholar of Neo-Kantianism, Frederick Beiser, has struck again, this time bringing his considerable analytical powers and erudition to the task of intellectual biography. For those of you aware of the distinguished philosophical career of Hermann Cohen (1859 – 1918) and the absence of an intellectual biography in English,... Read More
Christopher A. Molnar, “Memory, Politics, and Yugoslav Migrations to Postwar Germany” (Indiana UP, 2018)
During Europe’s 2015 refugee crisis, more than a hundred thousand asylum seekers from the western Balkans sought refuge in Germany. This was nothing new, however; immigrants from the Balkans have streamed into West Germany in massive numbers throughout the long postwar era. In his book Memory, Politics, and Yugoslav Migrations to... Read More
April Eisman, “Bernhard Heisig and the Fight for Modern Art in East Germany” (Camden House, 2018)
In her book, Bernhard Heisig and the Fight for Modern Art in East Germany (Camden House, 2018), April Eisman examines one of East Germany’s most successful artists as a point of entry into the vibrant art world of the “other” Germany. In the 1980s, Bernhard Heisig (1925-2011) was praised on... Read More
Thomas Kühne, “The Rise and Fall of Comradeship: Hitler’s Soldiers, Male Bonding and Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
In The Rise and Fall of Comradeship: Hitler’s Soldiers, Male Bonding and Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2017), Professor Thomas Kühne writes an innovative account of how the concept of comradeship shaped the actions, emotions and ideas of ordinary German soldiers across the two world wars... Read More
Chet Van Duzer, “Martin Waldseemüller’s ‘Carta marina’ of 1516: Study and Transcription of the Long Legends” (Springer, 2019)
Chet Van Duzer‘s new book Martin Waldseemüller’s ‘Carta marina’ of 1516: Study and Transcription of the Long Legends (Springer, 2019), presents the first detailed study of one of the most important masterpieces of Renaissance cartography. By transcribing, translating into English, and detailing the sources of all of the descriptive texts... Read More
Philipp Stelzel, “History after Hitler: A Transatlantic Enterprise” (U Penn Press, 2018)
The decades following the end of World War II witnessed the establishment of a large and diverse German-American scholarly community studying modern German history. As West Germany’s formerly deeply nationalist academic establishment began to reconcile itself with postwar liberalism, American historians played a crucial role, both assisting and learning from... Read More
Laura K. T. Stokes, “Fanny Hensel: A Research and Information Guide” (Routledge, 2019)
Nineteenth-century composer Fanny Hensel is the subject of more published research than any other woman of the period, with the possible exception of Clara Schumann. A prolific composer, salon hostess, and a member of a well-connected and prominent family, she was one of the first women composers that musicologists studied... Read More