New Books Network

Paul Mendes-Flohr, “Martin Buber: A Life of Faith and Dissent” (Yale UP, 2019)
In Martin Buber: A Life of Faith and Dissent (Yale University Press, 2019), Paul Mendes-Flohr, professor emeritus at the University of Chicago Divinity School and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, paints a detailed and compelling portrait of one of the twentieth century’s most versatile and influential thinkers. Tracing Buber’s personal... Read More
Han F. Vermeulen, “Before Boas: The Genesis of Ethnography and Ethnology in the German Enlightenment” (U Nebraska Press, 2015)
The history of anthropology has been written from multiple viewpoints, often from perspectives of gender, nationality, theory, or politics. Winner of the 2017 International Convention of Asia Scholars Book Prize, Before Boas: The Genesis of Ethnography and Ethnology in the German Enlightenment (University of Nebraska Press, 2015; paperback edition, 2018),... Read More
Iain MacGregor, “Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, The Berlin Wall, and the Most Dangerous Place On Earth” (Scribner, 2019)
There is perhaps no more iconic symbol of the Cold War than the Berlin Wall, the 96-mile-long barrier erected around West Berlin in 1961 to stem the flow of refugees from Eastern Europe. In Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, The Berlin Wall, and the Most Dangerous Place On Earth (Scribner,... Read More
Susan Neiman, “Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil” (FSG, 2019)
When Tennessee’s Governor recently ordered a holiday to celebrate the memory of confederate general Nathan Bedford Forest, a convicted war criminal who helped found the Ku Klax Klan, the New York Times columnist Paul Krugman commented: “The world would be horrified if Germany announced plans to start celebrating Erich von... Read More
Amy Carney, “Marriage and Fatherhood in the Nazi SS” (Toronto UP, 2018)
From 1931 to 1945, leaders of the SS sought to transform their organization into a racially-elite family community that would serve as the Third Reich’s new aristocracy. They utilized the science of eugenics to convince SS men to marry suitable wives and have many children. In her new book entitled... Read More
Ricky W. Law, “Transnational Nazism: Ideology and Culture in German-Japanese Relations, 1919-1936” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
In his new book, Transnational Nazism: Ideology and Culture in German-Japanese Relations, 1919-1936 (Cambridge University Press, 2019), associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University Ricky W. Law examines the cultural context of Tokyo and Berlin’s political rapprochement in 1936. This study of interwar German-Japanese relations is the first to... Read More
Yael Almog, “Secularism and Hermeneutics” (U Pennsylvania Press, 2019)
In the late Enlightenment, a new imperative began to inform theories of interpretation: all literary texts should be read in the same way that we read the Bible. However, this assumption concealed a problem—there was no coherent “we” who read the Bible in the same way. In Secularism and Hermeneutics... Read More