New Books Network

Lina del Castillo, “Crafting a Republic for the World: Scientific, Geographic and Historiographic Inventions of Colombia” (U Nebraska Press, 2018)
Lina del Castillo’s book explores scientific, geographic, and historiographic inventions in nineteenth-century Colombia. In this fascinating book, well-known figures of Colombia’s history (such as Francisco José de Caldas, and José María Samper) are cast under new light, while unexplored institutions such as the Instituto Caldas and the Colegio Militar are... Read More
M. L. Mitma and J. P. Heilman, “Now Peru is Mine: The Life and Times of a Campesino Activist” (Duke UP, 2016)
Now Peru is Mine: The Life and Times of a Campesino Activist (Duke University Press, 2016) tells the remarkable story of a campesino and indigenous political activist whose career spanned much of Peru’s twentieth century and whose achievements at the local and national level transformed Peruvian peasant politics. Structured as... Read More
Yuko Miki, “Frontiers of Citizenship: A Black and Indigenous History of Postcolonial Brazil” (Cambridge UP, 2018)
Yuko Miki’s book, Frontiers of Citizenship: A Black and Indigenous History of Postcolonial Brazil (Cambridge University Press, 2018), was the recent recipient of LASA’s 19th-century section Honorable Mention for Best Book. Frontiers of Citizenship is a beautifully written book that integrates quite seamlessly the history black and indigenous peoples in 19th-century Brazil.... Read More
Anna Rose Alexander, “City on Fire: Technology, Social Change, and the Hazards of Progress in Mexico City, 1860-1910” (U Pittsburgh Press, 2016)
Dr. Anna Rose Alexander’s City on Fire: Technology, Social Change, and the Hazards of Progress in Mexico City, 1860-1910 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016) looks at fire as an active agent of change in the urban environment (a catalyst for change). She examines the approaches to dealing with the ever-present... Read More
Carolina Alonso Bejarano, “Decolonizing Ethnography: Undocumented Immigrants and New Directions in Social Science” (Duke UP, 2019)
Almost 30 years ago, following the lead of scholars and thinkers of color and from the global South, anthropologist Faye Harrison and some of her colleagues published Decolonizing Anthropology: Moving Further Toward an Anthropology of Liberation. Harrison asked her readers: “How can anthropological knowledge advance the interests of the world’s... Read More
Daniel Nemser, “Infrastructures of Race: Concentration and Biopolitics in Colonial Mexico” (U Texas Press, 2017)
Daniel Nemser’s Infrastructures of Race: Concentration and Biopolitics in Colonial Mexico (University of Texas Press, 2017) examines the long history of how Spanish imperial rule depended upon spatial concentration – the gathering of people and things into centralized spaces – to control populations and consolidate power. Through four case studies... Read More
P. L. Caballero and A. Acevedo-Rodrigo, “Beyond Alterity: Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico” (U Arizona Press, 2018)
What happens when scholars approach the category of “indigenous” without presupposing its otherness? Edited by Paula López Caballero and Ariadna Acevedo-Rodrigo, Beyond Alterity: Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico (University of Arizona Press, 2018) is an interdisciplinary collection of essays that take such an approach to studying indigenous communities and... Read More