New Books Network

Amira Mittermaier, “Giving to God: Islamic Charity in Revolutionary Times” (U California Press, 2019)
In her stunning new book, Giving to God: Islamic Charity in Revolutionary Times (University of California Press, 2019), Amira Mittermaier, Associate Professor of Religion and Anthropology at the University of Toronto, conducts a dazzling and at many times moving ethnography of an Islamic economy of giving and charity in Egypt. By... Read More
Aaron Rock-Singer, “Practicing Islam in Egypt: Print Media and Islamic Revival” (Cambridge UP, 2019)
Discussions of Middle East politics will inevitably bring Islamism to the table and with it, questions of how Islam in its current iterations came to be. In most cases, the Islamic revival is emphasized as a major turning point in 20th-century Islam. In the case of Egypt, there’s even more... Read More
Jennifer Dixon, “Dark Pasts: Changing the State’s Story in Turkey and Japan” (Cornell UP, 2018)
Jennifer Dixon’s Dark Pasts: Changing the State’s Story in Turkey and Japan (Cornell University Press, 2018), investigates the Japanese and Turkish states’ narratives of their “dark pasts,” the Nanjing Massacre (1937-38) and Armenian Genocide (1915-17), respectively. The official version of history initially advocated by both states was similar in its adherence... Read More
Daniel Hershenzon, “The Captive Sea: Slavery, Communication, and Commerce in Early Modern Spain and the Mediterranean” (U Penn Press, 2018)
For hundreds of years, people living on the coasts of  the Mediterranean Sea enslaved one another. Moslems from North Africa captured Italians, French, and Spaniards; and North African Moslems were in turn enslaved by those nations. As prisoners, their ransom and redemption became a form of commerce, which in a... Read More
Mimi Hanaoka, “Authority and Identity in Medieval Islamic Historiography: Persian Histories from the Periphery” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
How do peripheral places assert the centrality of their identity? Why are fanciful events, like dreams and myths, useful narrative elements for identity construction and arguments about authority, legitimacy, and rhetoric? In Authority and Identity in Medieval Islamic Historiography: Persian Histories from the Periphery (Cambridge University Press, 2017), Mimi Hanaoka,... Read More
Jennifer Fluri and Rachel Lehr, “The Carpetbaggers of Kabul and Other American-Afghan Entanglements” (U Georgia Press, 2017)
For most people, geopolitics is something that happens out there, in boardrooms and on battlefields. But critical geographers, and feminist political geographers in particular, have in recent years shown how the geopolitical is something that comes into being in the intimate and the everyday. Enter Jennifer Fluri and Rachel Lehr‘s... Read More
Gökçe Günel, “Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi” (Duke UP, 2019)
Whether in space colonies or through geo-engineering, the looming disaster of climate change inspires no shortage of techno-utopian visions of human survival. Most of such hypotheses remain science fiction, but in Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi (Duke University Press, 2019), Gökçe Günel... Read More