New Books Network

Daniel Hershenzon, “The Captive Sea: Slavery, Communication, and Commerce in Early Modern Spain and the Mediterranean” (U Penn Press, 2018)
For hundreds of years, people living on the coasts of  the Mediterranean Sea enslaved one another. Moslems from North Africa captured Italians, French, and Spaniards; and North African Moslems were in turn enslaved by those nations. As prisoners, their ransom and redemption became a form of commerce, which in a... Read More
Mimi Hanaoka, “Authority and Identity in Medieval Islamic Historiography: Persian Histories from the Periphery” (Cambridge UP, 2017)
How do peripheral places assert the centrality of their identity? Why are fanciful events, like dreams and myths, useful narrative elements for identity construction and arguments about authority, legitimacy, and rhetoric? In Authority and Identity in Medieval Islamic Historiography: Persian Histories from the Periphery (Cambridge University Press, 2017), Mimi Hanaoka,... Read More
Jennifer Fluri and Rachel Lehr, “The Carpetbaggers of Kabul and Other American-Afghan Entanglements” (U Georgia Press, 2017)
For most people, geopolitics is something that happens out there, in boardrooms and on battlefields. But critical geographers, and feminist political geographers in particular, have in recent years shown how the geopolitical is something that comes into being in the intimate and the everyday. Enter Jennifer Fluri and Rachel Lehr‘s... Read More
Gökçe Günel, “Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi” (Duke UP, 2019)
Whether in space colonies or through geo-engineering, the looming disaster of climate change inspires no shortage of techno-utopian visions of human survival. Most of such hypotheses remain science fiction, but in Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi (Duke University Press, 2019), Gökçe Günel... Read More
Scott S. Reese, “Imperial Muslims: Islam, Community and Authority in the Indian Ocean, 1839-1937” (Edinburgh UP, 2017)
Religion and empire are often intertwined. Regarding Muslims there are well known dynasties like the Umayyad, the Abbasid, the Fatimid, the Ottoman, and many others. But the empire governing the largest Muslim population was, of course, the British. In Imperial Muslims: Islam, Community and Authority in the Indian Ocean, 1839-1937 (Edinburgh University... Read More
Andreas Krieg, “Divided Gulf: The Anatomy of a Crisis” (Palgrave, 2019)
Andreas Krieg’s edited volume, Divided Gulf: The Anatomy of a Crisis (Palgrave, 2019), brings together a group of prominent Gulf scholars to discuss the Gulf crisis that pits a Saudi-United Arab Emirates-led alliance against Qatar. The alliance’s economic and diplomatic boycott of Qatar since 2017 has implications that go far... Read More
Houri Berberian, “Roving Revolutionaries:  Armenians and the Connected Revolutions in the Russian, Iranian and Ottoman Worlds” (U California Press, 2019)
In her newest book, Roving Revolutionaries: Armenians and the Connected Revolutions in the Russian, Iranian and Ottoman Worlds (University of California Press, 2019), Dr. Houri Berberian uses a transnational or transimperial approach to examine the interconnectedness of 1905 Russian Revolution, the Iranian Revolution and the Young Turk Revolution and the... Read More