New Books Network

P. L. Caballero and A. Acevedo-Rodrigo, “Beyond Alterity: Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico” (U Arizona Press, 2018)
What happens when scholars approach the category of “indigenous” without presupposing its otherness? Edited by Paula López Caballero and Ariadna Acevedo-Rodrigo, Beyond Alterity: Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico (University of Arizona Press, 2018) is an interdisciplinary collection of essays that take such an approach to studying indigenous communities and... Read More
Gregory D. Smithers, “Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
In his book, Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal (University of Oklahoma Press, 2019), Dr. Gregory D. Smithers effectively articulates the complex history of Native Southerners. Smithers conveys the history of Native Southerners through numerous historical eras while properly reinterpreting popular misconceptions about the past in a way... Read More
Nick Estes, “Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline” (Verso, 2019)
The historian Nick Estes traces two centuries of Indigenous-led resistance and anti-colonial struggle. Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019) moves from settler colonialism and Indian Wars to the front lines of indigenous climate activism today.... Read More
Ian Saxine, “Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier” (NYU Press, 2019)
In Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier (NYU Press, 2019), Ian Saxine, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Bridgewater State University, shows the dynamic relationship between Native and English systems of property on the turbulent edge of Britain’s empire, and how so many colonists came... Read More
Manu Karuka, “Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad” (U California Press, 2019)
What does anti-imperialism look like from the vantage point of North America? In Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad (University of California Press, 2019), Manu Karuka (Barnard College) answers this question by reinterpreting the significance of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of Chinese workers and... Read More
Robbie Richardson, “The Savage and Modern Self: North American Indians in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
As they explored and struggled to establish settlements in what they called ‘new found lands’, the encounter with the peoples of those lands deeply affected how the British saw themselves. From the onset of colonisation, exotic visitors appeared in London. We recognise their names: Pocahontas, Manteo, Squanto. If you look... Read More
Lisa Blee and Jean M. O’Brien, “Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit” (UNC Press, 2019)
Installed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1921 to commemorate the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims, Cyrus Dallin’s statue Massasoit was intended to memorialize the Pokanoket Massasoit (leader) as a welcoming diplomat and participant in the mythical first Thanksgiving. But after the statue’s unveiling, Massasoit began to move and proliferate... Read More