New Books Network

Joseph E. Taylor III, “Persistent Callings: Seasons of Work and Identity on the Oregon Coast” (Oregon State UP, 2019)
George Perkins Marsh Prize winning environmental historian and geographer Joseph E. Taylor III‘s new book, Persistent Callings: Seasons of Work and Identity on the Oregon Coast (Oregon State University Press, 2019), takes an innovative approach to the history of fisheries and work in the Pacific Northwest. Focusing on the Nestucca... Read More
Alex Hidalgo, “Trail of Footprints: A History of Indigenous Maps from Viceregal Mexico” (U Texas Press, 2019)
There is far more to a map than meets the eye. Such is the case in historian Alex Hidalgo’s Trail of Footprints: A History of Indigenous Maps from Viceregal Mexico (University of Texas Press, 2019), which focuses on the complex lives of dozens of Oaxacan maps created by Indigenous mapmakers.... Read More
Pilar M. Herr, “Contested Nation: The Mapuche, Bandits, and State Formation in 19th-Century Chile” (U New Mexico Press, 2019)
Pilar M. Herr’s new book Contested Nation: The Mapuche, Bandits, and State Formation in Nineteenth-Century Chile (University of New Mexico Press, 2019) places the independent Mapuche people and pro-Spanish Pincheira bandits at the heart of Chile’s nineteenth century. During the 1820s, while criollo elites struggled openly between themselves to form... Read More
Martín Prechtel, “The Disobedience of the Daughter of the Sun” (North Atlantic Books, 2005)
Today I interview Martín Prechtel, whose work ranges from painting and drawing to overlooked histories and living languages to farming and blacksmithing and cooking to the six books he’s written, which cover topics so vast in genres so varied that all the short descriptions I’ve tried to give of them... Read More
Megan Kate Nelson, “The Three-Cornered War: The Union, the Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West” (Scribner, 2019)
What did the American Civil War look like from Diné Bikéyah and Apacheria? This is just one of the many questions that drives historian Megan Kate Nelson’s The Three-Cornered War: The Union, The Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West (Scribner, 2020), which details the Civil War’s... Read More
Lauren Working, “The Making of an Imperial Polity: Civility and America in the Jacobean Metropolis” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
In his Relation of the second voyage to Guiana, published in 1596, George Chapman put the imperial ambitions of England into a telling verse couplet. ‘Riches, and Conquest, and Renowne I sing. / Riches with honour, Conquest without bloud’. For the metropolitan gentlemen of early 17th-century London, the colonising project... Read More
Benjamin Dangl, “The Five Hundred Year Rebellion: Indigenous Movements and the Decolonization of History in Bolivia” (AK Press, 2019)
Moments before his death at the hands of Spanish colonial officials on November 15, 1781, Aymaran leader Túpac Katari assured his apostles as well as his adversaries that he would “return as millions.” As promised, Katari’s presence in Bolivia did not end with his life. In the centuries since his... Read More
Gonzalo Lamana, “How ‘Indians’ Think: Colonial Indigenous Intellectuals and the Question of Critical Race Theory” (U Arizona Press, 2019)
In his new book, How “Indians” Think: Colonial Indigenous Intellectuals and the Question of Critical Race Theory (University of Arizona Press, 2019), Dr. Gonzalo Lamana carefully investigates the writings of Indigenous intellectuals of the Andean region during Spanish colonialism. By delving into and reinterpreting the work of Guaman Poma de... Read More
Darnella Davis, “Untangling a Red, White, and Black Heritage: A Personal History of the Allotment Era” (U New Mexico Press, 2018)
In Untangling a Red, White, and Black Heritage: A Personal History of the Allotment Era (U New Mexico Press, 2018), Darnella Davis combines the personal with the national in telling the story of allotment in Indian Territory/Oklahoma. Dr. Davis traces her family story back several generations and explores the contested and... Read More
Céline Carayon, “Eloquence Embodied: Nonverbal Communication among French and Indigenous Peoples in the Americas” (UNC Press, 2019)
Taking a fresh look at the first two centuries of French colonialism in the Americas, Eloquence Embodied: Nonverbal Communication among French and Indigenous Peoples in the Americas (University of North Carolina Press and the Omohundro Institute, 2019), answers the long-standing question of how, and how well, Indigenous Americans and the Europeans who... Read More