New Books Network

Nick Estes, “Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline” (Verso, 2019)
The historian Nick Estes traces two centuries of Indigenous-led resistance and anti-colonial struggle. Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019) moves from settler colonialism and Indian Wars to the front lines of indigenous climate activism today.... Read More
Ian Saxine, “Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier” (NYU Press, 2019)
In Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier (NYU Press, 2019), Ian Saxine, Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Bridgewater State University, shows the dynamic relationship between Native and English systems of property on the turbulent edge of Britain’s empire, and how so many colonists came... Read More
Manu Karuka, “Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad” (U California Press, 2019)
What does anti-imperialism look like from the vantage point of North America? In Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad (University of California Press, 2019), Manu Karuka (Barnard College) answers this question by reinterpreting the significance of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of Chinese workers and... Read More
Robbie Richardson, “The Savage and Modern Self: North American Indians in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture” (U Toronto Press, 2018)
As they explored and struggled to establish settlements in what they called ‘new found lands’, the encounter with the peoples of those lands deeply affected how the British saw themselves. From the onset of colonisation, exotic visitors appeared in London. We recognise their names: Pocahontas, Manteo, Squanto. If you look... Read More
Lisa Blee and Jean M. O’Brien, “Monumental Mobility: The Memory Work of Massasoit” (UNC Press, 2019)
Installed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1921 to commemorate the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims, Cyrus Dallin’s statue Massasoit was intended to memorialize the Pokanoket Massasoit (leader) as a welcoming diplomat and participant in the mythical first Thanksgiving. But after the statue’s unveiling, Massasoit began to move and proliferate... Read More
Sarah Miller-Davenport, “Gateway State: Hawai’i and the Cultural Transformation of American Empire” (Princeton UP, 2019)
One of my talking points when hanging out with my fellow diplomatic historians is the painful absence of scholarship on Hawaii. Too many political histories treat Hawaii’s statehood as a kind of historical inevitability, an event that was bound to pass the moment the kingdom was annexed. As I would... Read More
Kris Lane, “Potosí: The Silver City That Changed the World” (U California Press, 2019)
In 1545, a native Andean prospector hit pay dirt on a desolate red mountain in highland Bolivia. There followed the world’s greatest silver bonanza, making the Cerro Rico or “Rich Hill” and the Imperial Villa of Potosí instant legends, famous from Istanbul to Beijing. The Cerro Rico alone provided over... Read More