New Books Network

Rachel V. González, “Quinceañera Style: Social Belonging and Latinx Consumer Identities” (U Texas Press, 2019)
A quinceañera is a traditional fifteenth birthday celebration for young women (though in contemporary times, it can also be for young men) in many Latinx communities.  While the celebration has roots in religiosity, it has also become a space for imagining and performing class, identity, and Americanity.  With fieldwork conducted... Read More
Julia Sneeringer, “A Social History of Early Rock ‘n’ Roll in Germany: Hamburg from Burlesque to The Beatles, 1956-69” (Bloomsbury, 2018)
The Beatles’ sojourn in the St. Pauli district of Hamburg during the early 1960s is part of music legend. As Julia Sneeringer reveals in A Social History of Early Rock ‘n’ Roll in Germany: Hamburg from Burlesque to The Beatles, 1956-69 (Bloomsbury, 2018), though, this was just the most famous... Read More
Jonathan Robinson, “Rights at the Margins: Historical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives” (Brill, 2020)
The essays in Rights at the Margins: Historical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives (Brill) explore the ways rights were available to those in the margins of society. By tracing pivotal judicial concepts such as ‘right of necessity’ and ‘subjective rights’ back to their medieval versions, and by situating them in unexpected... Read More
Zachary Dorner, “Merchants of Medicine: The Commerce and Coercion of Health in Britain’s Long 18th Century” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
In Merchants of Medicine: The Commerce and Coercion of Health in Britain’s Long Eighteenth Century (The University of Chicago Press), medicines embody the hopes of those who prepared, sold, and ingested them. By investigating the different contexts and practices associated with the British long-distance trade in patent medicines, Zachary Dorner... Read More
Despina Stratigakos, “Hitler’s Northern Utopia: Building the New Order in Occupied Norway” (Princeton UP, 2020)
In her new book Hitler’s Northern Utopia: Building the New Order in Occupied Norway (Princeton University Press, 2020), Despina Stratigakos investigates the Nazi occupation of Norway. Between 1940 and 1945, German occupiers transformed Norway into a vast construction zone. This remarkable building campaign, largely unknown today, was designed to extend the... Read More
Ann-elise Lewallen, “The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity, Gender, and Settler Colonialism in Japan” (U New Mexico Press, 2016)
The Fabric of Indigeneity: Ainu Identity, Gender, and Settler Colonialism in Japan (University of New Mexico Press) is a recent addition to the growing scholarship on Ainu identity and settler colonialism in Japan. Combining ethnographic fieldwork in contemporary Ainu communities and organizations with museum and archival research, Dr. Lewallen shows... Read More
Omar H. Ali, “Malik Ambar: Power and Slavery across the Indian Ocean” (Oxford UP, 2016)
Omar H. Ali’s Malik Ambar: Power and Slavery across the Indian Ocean (Oxford University Press, 2016), provides insight into the life of slave soldier Malik Ambar. It offers a rare look at an individual who began in obscurity in the Horn of Africa and reached the highest levels of South... Read More
Alexander Keyssar, “Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College?” (Harvard UP, 2020)
The title of Harvard historian Alexander Keyssar,’s new book poses the question that comes up every presidential election cycle: Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College? (Harvard University Press, 2020). Keyssar presents the reader with a deep, layered, and complex analysis not only of the institution of the Electoral... Read More
Victor McFarland, “Oil Powers: A History of the US-Saudi Alliance” (Columbia UP, 2020)
The relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia is a critical feature of the modern international system. It binds the global hegemon to a region on the other side of the planet. And it has facilitated capitalist-led globalization. However, as both the US and and Saudi governments have tried... Read More
Jack Santino, “Public Performances: Studies in the Carnivalesque and Ritualesque” (UP Colorado, 2017)
Public Performances: Studies in the Carnivalesque and Ritualesque (University Press of Colorado) offers a deep and wide-ranging exploration of relationships among genres of public performance and of the underlying political motivations they share. Illustrating the connections among three themes—the political, the carnivalesque, and the ritualesque—the volume provides rich and comprehensive... Read More