New Books Network

Hanna Garth, “Food In Cuba: The Pursuit of a Decent Meal” (Stanford UP, 2020)
In Food In Cuba: The Pursuit of a Decent Meal (Stanford University Press, 2020), Hanna Garth examines the processes of acquiring food and preparing meals in the midst of food shortages. Garth draws our attention to the social, cultural, and historical factors Cuban’s draw upon to define an appropriate or decent meal and... Read More
Hafsa Lodi, ”Modesty: A Fashion Paradox” (Neem Tree Press, 2020)
Modest fashion is a growing, global multi-billion-dollar market. As a fashion trend, it has increasingly made its way into high-profile runways, has been endorsed by celebrities, and profiled in major fashion publications and news outlets.   Hafsa Lodi’s  Modesty: A Fashion Paradox (Neem Tree Press, 2020) investigates how and why modest fashion became a mainstream... Read More
Peniel E. Joseph, “The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.” (Basic, 2020)
How do the political afterlives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. continue to shape American democracy? How does a common myth of opposition distort our understanding of civil rights? In his dual biography, The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.... Read More
Sabine Hildebrandt, “The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich” (Berghahn, 2017)
Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who remained joined the Nazi party, and some helped to develop the scientific basis for its... Read More
Francine Hirsch, “Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg” (Oxford UP, 2020)
How did an authoritarian regime help lay the cornerstones of human rights and international law? Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War II  (Oxford University Press, 2020) argues that Anglo-American dominated histories capture the moment while missing the story. Drawing upon secret... Read More
Luca Scholz, “Borders and Freedom of Movement in the Holy Roman Empire” (Oxford UP, 2020)
“Today we speak with Luca Scholz, a Lecturer at the University of Manchester. Dr. Scholz has varied interests: the relationship of political authority and human mobility, early modern history, and the use of geospatial and computational methods to study the past, all of which intersect in the topic of today’s... Read More
Mia Fischer, “Terrorizing Gender: Transgender Visibility and the Surveillance Practices of the U.S. Security State” (U Nebraska Press, 2019)
In Terrorizing Gender: Transgender Visibility and the Surveillance Practices of the U.S. Security State (University of Nebraska Press, 2019), Mia Fischer traces how media and state actors collude in the violent disciplining of trans women, exposing the traps of visibility by illustrating that dominant representations of trans people as deceptive,... Read More
Takashi Miura, “Agents of World Renewal: The Rise of Yonaoshi Gods in Japan” (U Hawaii Press, 2019)
In this interview, we talk to Takashi Miura, assistant professor in the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona, about his book Agents of World Renewal: The Rise of Yonaoshi Gods in Japan, (University of Hawaii Press, 2019). The book examines a category of Japanese divinities that centered on... Read More
Robert Gerwarth, “November 1918: The German Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Was Weimar doomed from the outset? In November 1918: The German Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2020), Robert Gerwarth argues that this is the wrong question to ask. Forget 1929 and 1933, the collapse of Imperial Germany began as a velvet revolution where optimism was as common as pessimism. A masterful... Read More