New Books Network

Anthony Valerio, “Semmelweis: The Women’s Doctor” (Zantedeschi Books, 2019)
Though his advice has saved the lives of millions of people, the name Ignaz Semmelweis is not one commonly known today. In his book Anthony Valerio’s Semmelweis: The Women’s Doctor (Zantedeschi Books, 2019). Valerio details the many struggles Semmelweis faced in winning acceptance for his advice on antiseptic procedures. The... Read More
Michael Braddick, “The Common Freedom of the People: John Lilburne and the English Revolution” (Oxford UP, 2018)
As historical topics, political revolutions come in and out of fashion. At the moment the American Revolution as an ideological struggle engages the public, but historians are less sure. Books that used to have the Revolution at their centre now approach it from the edges and peripheries, integrating the experiences... Read More
M’hamed Oualdi, “A Slave between Empires: A Transimperial History of North Africa” (Columbia UP, 2020)
In light of the profound physical and mental traumas of colonization endured by North Africans, historians of recent decades have primarily concentrated their studies of North Africa on colonial violence, domination, and shock. The choice is an understandable one. But in his new monograph, A Slave between Empires: A Transimperial... Read More
Mitchell Nathanson, “Bouton: The Life of a Baseball Original” (U Nebraska Press, 2020)
Today we are joined by Dr. Mitchell Nathanson, author of the book Bouton: The Life of a Baseball Original (University of Nebraska Press, 2020). Nathanson, a professor of law at the Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports at Villanova University, examines the life of Jim Bouton, a... Read More
Derek Penslar, “Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader” (Yale UP, 2020)
The life of Theodor Herzl (1860–1904) was as puzzling as it was brief. How did this cosmopolitan and assimilated European Jew become the leader of the Zionist movement? How could he be both an artist and a statesman, a rationalist and an aesthete, a stern moralist yet possessed of deep,... Read More
Brandon K. Winford, “John Hervey Wheeler, Black Banking, and the Economic Struggle for Civil Rights” (UP Kentucky, 2019)
John Hervey Wheeler (1908–1978) was one of the civil rights movement’s most influential leaders. In articulating a bold vision of regional prosperity grounded in full citizenship and economic power for African Americans, this banker, lawyer, and visionary would play a key role in the fight for racial and economic equality... Read More
Chris Fleming, “On Drugs” (Giramondo Publishing, 2019)
“After I’d finished my rapid-fire history of self-justification he paused and then said, deadpan and rural-Australian-slow: ‘Right. Ok. So how is that all working out for you?'” On Drugs (Giramondo Publishing, 2019) explores Australian philosopher Chris Fleming’s experience of addiction, which begins when he is a student at the University... Read More
Nancy Mattina, “Uncommon Anthropologist: Gladys Reichard and Western Native American Culture” (U Oklahoma Press, 2019)
Protégé of Elsie Clews Parsons and Franz Boas, founder and head of Barnard College’s anthropology department, and a trailblazer in Native American linguistics and anthropology, Gladys Reichard (1893–1955) is one of America’s least appreciated anthropologists. Her accomplishments were obscured in her lifetime by differences in intellectual approach and envy, as... Read More
Lisa Balabanlilar, “The Emperor Jahangir: Power and Kingship in Mughal India” (I. B. Tauris, 2020)
Despite a reign that lasted for over two decades, the Mughal emperor Jahangir has often been regarded as a weak ruler who was hobbled by his addictions and dominated in his later years by his wife Nur Jahan. As Lisa Balabanlilar reveals in The Emperor Jahangir: Power and Kingship in... Read More