New Books Network

Roland De Wolk, “American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford” (U California Press, 2019)
With a name associated with the famous university in Palo Alto, Leland Stanford is among the best-known of the famous “robber barons” of the 19th century. Yet as Roland De Wolk explains in American Disruptor: The Scandalous Life of Leland Stanford (University of California Press, 2019), much of his fascinating... Read More
Richard J. Bernstein, “Why Read Hannah Arendt Now” (Polity, 2018)
Nobody should feel excited about the renewed relevance of Hannah Arendt’s work today. Her foresight about the fragility of democratic life is relevant for the worst possible reasons: populism, white supremacy, mass deception, the rise of fascism around the world, the coordinated assault on serious journalism, academia and any kind... Read More
David Hayton, “Conservative Revolutionary: The Lives of Lewis Namier” (Manchester UP, 2019)
Acclaimed after the Second World War as England’s greatest historian, Sir Lewis Namier was an eastern European immigrant who came to idealise the English gentleman and enjoyed close friendship with leading figures of his day, including Winston Churchill. Today, Namier is associated with the belief that the thoughts and actions... Read More
Wendy Wickwire, “At The Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging” (UBC Press, 2019)
The history of anthropology remembers James Teit as a field assistant and man-on-the spot for Franz Boas. But in At The Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging (University of British Columbia Press, 2019). Wendy Wickwire turns this picture upside down, revealing Teit to be a superb ethnographer in his... Read More
Robert Mann, “Becoming Ronald Reagan: The Rise of a Conservative Icon” (Potomac Books, 2019)
Throughout much of his career as an actor in Hollywood, Ronald Reagan identified as a passionate New Deal Democrat, yet by the time he turned to a career in politics in the 1960s he was a conservative Republican. In Becoming Ronald Reagan: The Rise of a Conservative Icon (Potomac Books,... Read More
Douglas R. Egerton, “Heirs of an Honored Name: The Decline of the Adams Family and the Rise of Modern America” (Basic Books, 2019)
John and Abigail Adams founded a famous political family, but they would not witness its calamitous fall from grace. When John Quincy Adams died in 1848, so began the slow decline of the family’s political legacy. In Heirs of an Honored Name: The Decline of the Adams Family and the... Read More
Paul Mendes-Flohr, “Martin Buber: A Life of Faith and Dissent” (Yale UP, 2019)
In Martin Buber: A Life of Faith and Dissent (Yale University Press, 2019), Paul Mendes-Flohr, professor emeritus at the University of Chicago Divinity School and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, paints a detailed and compelling portrait of one of the twentieth century’s most versatile and influential thinkers. Tracing Buber’s personal... Read More