New Books Network

Sasha Costanza-Chock, “Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need” (MIT Press, 2020)
In Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need (MIT Press, 2020), Sasha Costanza-Chock, an associate professor of Civic Media at MIT, builds the case for designers and researchers to make the communities they impact co-equal partners in the products, services, and organizations they create. This requires more than... Read More
Andrew Kettler, “The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
In his new book, The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Dr. Andrew Kettler charts the impact that smell had on the making of race and justifications for enslavement in the Atlantic world. Western European defined the African subject as a scented object,... Read More
Marika Rose, “A Theology of Failure: Žižek Against Christian Innocence” (Fordham UP, 2019)
Christian theology has a long and at times contradictory history, riddled with tensions that make it difficult (if not impossible) to develop a single systematic account of what Christianity is. However, rather than see this as a shortcoming, one can instead try and see this as a productive philosophical and... Read More
Ari Linden, “Karl Kraus and the Discourse of Modernity” (Northwestern UP, 2020)
In Karl Kraus and the Discourse of Modernity (Northwestern University Press, 2020), Ari Linden analyzes Karl Kraus’s oeuvre while engaging in the conversation about modernism and modernity, which is shaped and conditioned by the already post-postmodern condition. This perspective opens up the exploration of modernist projects and allows a discussion... Read More
Raluca Soreanu, “Working-through Collective Wounds: Trauma, Denial, Recognition in the Brazilian Uprising” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
Working-through Collective Wounds: Trauma, Denial, Recognition in the Brazilian Uprising (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) formulates a theory of collective trauma, drawing on the work of Sándor Ferenczi. Dr. Soreanu takes Ferenczi into the public square to answer a series of questions. What does it mean to understand the operation of the... Read More
Christina Dunbar-Hester, “Hacking Diversity: The Politics of Inclusion in Open Technology Cultures” (Princeton UP, 2020)
In Hacking Diversity: The Politics of Inclusion in Open Technology Cultures (Princeton University Press, 2020), Christina-Dunbar Hester, an associate professor in the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, explores the world of open technology – communities centered on knowledge sharing. In particular, she investigates how these communities are considering... Read More
Kevin Escudero, “Organizing While Undocumented: Immigrant Youth’s Political Activism Under the Law” (NYU Press, 2020)
Undocumented youth activists are at the forefront of the present-day immigrant rights movement. This is especially true surrounding the activism of the recent SCOTUS decision on DACA issued on June 18, 2020. Professor Kevin Escudero’s book, Organizing While Undocumented: Immigrant Youth’s Political Activism Under the Law (New York University Press, 2020), depicts just... Read More
Y. F. Niemann and G. Gutiérrez y Muhs, “Presumed Incompetent II: Race, Class, Power, and Resistance of Women in Academia” (Utah State UP, 2019)
The courageous and inspiring personal narratives and empirical studies in Presumed Incompetent II: Race, Class, Power, and Resistance of Women in Academia (Utah State University Press, 2019) name formidable obstacles and systemic biases that all women faculty—from diverse intersectional and transnational identities and from tenure track, terminal contract, and administrative... Read More
Martin Jay, “Splinters in Your Eye: Frankfurt School Provocations” (Verso, 2020) 
Although successive generations of the Frankfurt School have attempted to adapt Critical Theory to new circumstances, the work done by its founding members continues in the twenty-first century to unsettle conventional wisdom about culture, society and politics. Exploring unexamined episodes in the school’s history and reading its work in unexpected... Read More