New Books Network

Shiu-Yin Sharon Yam, “Inconvenient Strangers: Transnational Subjects and the Politics of Citizenship” (Ohio State UP, 2019)
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (s/t interviews Shiu-Yin Sharon Yam of University of Kentucky on the new book, Inconvenient Strangers: Transnational Subjects and the Politics of Citizenship (Ohio State University Press, 2019), which explores how intersecting networks of power—particularly race and ethnicity, gender, and social... Read More
Elinor Carmi, “Media Distortions: Understanding the Power Behind Spam, Noise, and Other Deviant Media” (Peter Lang, 2020)
What is spam? In Media Distortions: Understanding the Power Behind Spam, Noise, and Other Deviant Media (Peter Lang, 2020), Dr Elinor Carmi, a postdoctoral research associate in digital culture and society at the University of Liverpool, takes this simple category that seems ever present in our online lives to explain corporate... Read More
Viet Thanh Nguyen, “Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War” (Harvard UP, 2016)
According to Viet Thanh Nguyen, all wars are fought twice: first on the field of battle, and then in the struggles over memory. In Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War (Harvard University Press, 2016) he explores the various ways in which the American War in Vietnam has... Read More
Thomas A. Discenna, “Discourses of Denial: The Rhetoric of American Academic Labor” (Routledge, 2017)
On this episode of the New Books Network, Lee Pierce (they/she) interviews Thomas A. Discenna of Oakland University about the myriad ways that the labor of those employed by universities is situated as somehow distinct from ordinary labor. Focusing on a variety of sites where academic labor is discursively constructed... Read More
Richard Lachmann, “First Class Passengers on a Sinking Ship: Elite Politics and the Decline of Great Powers” (Verso, 2020)
Richard Lachmann’s First Class Passengers on a Sinking Ship: Elite Politics and the Decline of Great Powers (Verso, 2020) is a two-for-one deal. The first half of the book is a historical analysis of why some empires transform their geopolitical power into global hegemony while others fail to do so,... Read More
Dana El Kurd, “Polarized and Demobilized: Legacies of Authoritarianism in Palestine” (Oxford UP, 2020)
What demobilizes a once mobilized society? How does international involvement amplify or suppress these dynamics? In Polarized and Demobilized: Legacies of Authoritarianism in Palestine (Oxford University Press, 2020), Dana El Kurd’s new book uses a case study to interrogate how the Palestinian Authority – as an indigenous institution – more... Read More
Santiago Zabala, “Being at Large: Freedom in the Ago of Alternative Facts” (McGill-Queen’s UP, 2020)
In recent years, questions around the nature of ​truth ​and ​facts have reentered public debate, often in discussions around journalistic bias, and whether politically neutral reporting is possible, or even desirable. Many pundits have tried to place blame for the increasingly slippery and fickle nature of truth in reporting on... Read More
James M. Jasper, “Public Characters: The Politics of Reputation and Blame” (Oxford UP, 2020)
Did Donald Trump win the U.S. presidency in 2016 because he was a master of character work – able to sum up opponents in pithy epithets that encourage the public to see them as weak or immoral? What is character work and how do characters with roots in ancient crease... Read More
Noëlle McAfee, “Fear of Breakdown: Psychoanalysis and Politics” (Columbia UP, 2019)
In his classic essay on the fear of breakdown, Donald Winnicott famously conveys to a patient that the disaster powerfully feared has, in fact, already happened.  Taking her cue from Winnicott, Noëlle McAfee’s Fear of Breakdown: Psychoanalysis and Politics (Columbia University Press, 2019), explores the implications of breakdown fears for... Read More