New Books Network

Caron Gentry, “Disordered Violence: How Gender, Race and Heteronormativity Structure Terrorism” (Edinburgh UP, 2020)
In Disordered Violence: How Gender, Race and Heteronormativity Structure Terrorism (Edinburgh University Press, 2020), Caron Gentry looks at how gender, race, and heteronormative expectations of public life shape Western understandings of terrorism as irrational, immoral and illegitimate. Gentry examines the profiles of 8 well-known terrorist actors. Gentry identifies the gendered,... Read More
Karen Patel, “The Politics of Expertise in Cultural Labour: Arts, Work and Inequalities” (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020)
How has social media changed inequality in the cultural industries? In The Politics of Expertise in Cultural Labour: Arts, Work and Inequalities (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020), Karen Patel, AHRC Leadership Fellow based at Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research, Birmingham City University, considers the idea of expertise in cultural... Read More
Tanya Kant, “Making it Personal: Algorithmic Personalization, Identity, and Everyday Life” (Oxford UP, 2020)
How are algorithms shaping our experience of the internet? In Making it Personal: Algorithmic Personalization, Identity, and Everyday Life (Oxford University Press), Tanya Kant, a lecturer in Media And Cultural Studies at the University of Sussex interrogates the rise of algorithmic personalization, in the context of an internet dominated by... Read More
M. Hennefeld and N. Sammond, “Abjection Incorporated: Mediating the Politics of Pleasure and Violence” (Duke UP, 2020)
From the films of Larry Clark to the feminist comedy of Amy Schumer to the fall of Louis C. K., comedic, graphic, and violent moments of abjection have permeated twentieth- and twenty-first-century social and political discourse. The contributors to Abjection Incorporated: Mediating the Politics of Pleasure and Violence (Duke University... Read More
Orit Kamir, “Betraying Dignity” (Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2019)
What do medieval knights, suicide bombers and “victimhood culture” have in common? Betraying Dignity: The Toxic Seduction of Social Media, Shaming, and Radicalization (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press) argues that in the second decade of the twenty-first century, individuals, political parties and nations around the world are abandoning the dignity-based culture... Read More
Michael Rectenwald, “Beyond Woke” (New English Review Press, 2020)
A few short years ago, Michael Rectenwald was a Marxist professor at NYU, pursuing his career and contemplating becoming a Trotskyist, when the political climate on campus – victimology, cancel-culture, no-platforming, and political correctness run-amok – began to bother him. He responded by creating a Twitter handle, @AntiPCNYUProf (now @TheAntiPCProf),... Read More
Khurram Hussain, “Islam as Critique: Sayyid Ahmad Khan and the Challenge of Modernity” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019)
Delighting in Khurram Hussain’s consistently sparkling prose is reason enough to read his new book Islam as Critique: Sayyid Ahmad Khan and the Challenge of Modernity (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019). But there is much more to this splendid book, framed around the profoundly consequential conceptual and political question of can Muslims... Read More
Nadine El-Enany, “Bordering Britain: Law, Race and Empire” (Manchester UP, 2020)
How can we understand the legacy of colonialism within contemporary society? In Bordering Britain Law, Race and Empire (Manchester University Press, 2020), Nadine El-Enany, a senior lecturer in law at Birkbeck School of Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Race and Law, historicises immigration law and ideas... Read More
Sasha Costanza-Chock, “Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need” (MIT Press, 2020)
In Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need (MIT Press, 2020), Sasha Costanza-Chock, an associate professor of Civic Media at MIT, builds the case for designers and researchers to make the communities they impact co-equal partners in the products, services, and organizations they create. This requires more than... Read More
Andrew Kettler, “The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
In his new book, The Smell of Slavery: Olfactory Racism and the Atlantic World (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Dr. Andrew Kettler charts the impact that smell had on the making of race and justifications for enslavement in the Atlantic world. Western European defined the African subject as a scented object,... Read More