New Books Network

Philis Barragán-Goetz, “Reading, Writing, and Revolution: Escuelitas and the Emergence of a Mexican American Identity in Texas” (U Texas Press, 2020)
Debates about Ethnic Studies in K-12 and Higher Education have highlighted the importance of culturally inclusive pedagogy in schools. Despite discussions about Ethnic Studies, there is a more extended history of Mexican-origin people pushing for culturally responsive education. In Reading, Writing, and Revolution: Escuelitas and the Emergence of a Mexican... Read More
Katie Day Good, “Bring the World to the Child: Technologies of Global Citizenship in American Education” (MIT Press, 2020)
Even before the Covid-19 pandemic, boosters of digital educational technologies emphasized that these platforms are vital tools for cultivating global citizenship, connecting students across borders, and creating a participatory learning environment. In Bring the World to the Child: Technologies of Global Citizenship in American Education (MIT Press), Katie Day Good... Read More
Arthur B. Markman, “Bring Your Brain to Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do It Well, and Advance Your Career” (HBR Press, 2019)
What does it take to both fit in and yet also prosper and grow as a person in the workplace? In this interview, I discuss this question and others with noted psychologist Arthur B. Markman. Markman is a professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin,... Read More
Christopher Newfield, “The Great Mistake: How We Wrecked Public Universities and How We Can Fix Them” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2016)
In The Great Mistake: How We Wrecked Public Universities and How We Can Fix Them (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016), Christopher Newfield diagnoses what he sees as a crisis in American public higher education. He argues that since roughly the 1980s, American public universities have entered into a devolutionary cycle... Read More
LaDale Winling, “Building the Ivory Tower: Universities and Metropolitan Development in the Twentieth Century” (U Penn Press, 2018)
Universities have become state-like entities, possessing their own hospitals, police forces, and real estate companies. To become such behemoths, higher education institutions relied on the state for resources and authority. Through government largesse and shrewd legal maneuvering, university administrators became powerful interests in urban planning during the twentieth century. LaDale... Read More
Nicole Piemonte, “Afflicted: How Vulnerability Can Heal Medical Education and Practice” (MIT Press, 2018)
In Afflicted: How Vulnerability Can Heal Medical Education and Practice (The MIT Press), Nicole Piemonte examines the preoccupation in medicine with cure over care, arguing that the traditional focus on biological intervention keeps medicine from addressing the complex realities of patient suffering. Although many have pointed to the lack of... Read More
T. Paulus and A. Wise, “Looking for Insight, Transformation, and Learning in Online Talk ” (Routledge, 2019)
In this episode, I speak with Dr. Trena Paulus of East Tennessee State University and Dr. Alyssa Wise of New York University on their new book, Looking for Insight, Transformation, and Learning in Online Talk (Routledge, 2019). The book offers a comprehensive discussion of conducting research on online talk, which... Read More
Wade Davies, “Native Hoops: The Rise of American Indian Basketball, 1895-1970” (UP of Kansas, 2020)
The game of basketball is perceived by most today as an “urban” game with a locale such as Rucker Park in Harlem as the game’s epicenter (as well as a pipeline to the NBA).  While that is certainly a true statement, basketball is not limited to places such as New... Read More
Xueli Wang, “On My Own: The Challenge and Promise of Building Equitable STEM Transfer Pathways” (Harvard Education Press, 2020)
In this episode, I speak with Dr. Xueli Wang from the University of Wisconsin-Madison on her new book, “On My Own: The Challenge and Promise of Building Equitable STEM Transfer Pathways (Harvard Education Press, 2020). For decades, the shortage of STEM talents has been a national concern in the United States.... Read More
Jeffrey R. Young, “Beyond the MOOC Hype: A Guide to Higher Education’s High-Tech Disruption” (CHE, 2013)
Remember when Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) were going to shake higher education to its foundations by giving courses from the world’s most prestigious colleges and universities away free to the world? Today’s guest, Jeffrey Young – Senior Editor at the online educational publication EdSurge and host of the Edsurge... Read More