New Books Network

Tobias Straumann, “1931: Debt, Crisis, and the Rise of Hitler” (Oxford UP, 2019)
What can we learn from the financial crisis that brought Hitler to power? How did diplomatic deadlock fuel the rise of authoritarianism? Tobias Straumann shares vital insights with 1931: Debt, Crisis, and the Rise of Hitler (Oxford University Press, 2019). Through his fast-paced narrative, Straumann reveals how inflexible treaties created... Read More
Shennette Garrett-Scott, “Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance Before the New Deal” (Columbia UP, 2019)
Think running an insurance company or a bank is hard?  Try doing it as an African-American woman in the Jim Crow South.  Shennette Garrett-Scott‘s new book, Banking on Freedom: Black Women in U.S. Finance Before the New Deal (Columbia University Press, 2019) tells the fascinating story of just such an... Read More
Francesca Trivellato, “The Promise and Peril of Credit” (Princeton UP, 2019)
In 1647, the French author Étienne Cleirac asserted in his book Les us, et coustumes de la mer that the credit instruments known as bills of exchange had been invented by Jews. In The Promise and Peril of Credit: What a Forgotten Legend about Jews and Finance Tells Us about... Read More
William Gale, “Fiscal Therapy: Curing America’s Debt Addiction and Investing in the Future” (Oxford UP, 2019)
The US government is laboring under an enormous debt burden, one that will impact the living standards of future generations of Americans by limiting investment in people and infrastructure. In his new book, Fiscal Therapy: Curing America’s Debt Addiction and Investing in the Future (Oxford University Press, 2019), Brookings Institution... Read More
James O’Toole, “The Enlightened Capitalists: Cautionary Tales of Business Pioneers Who Tried to Do Well by Doing Good” (HarperBusiness, 2019)
Is the University of Chicago-blessed, “greed is good” near-term profits approach to business wearing out its welcome? James O’Toole‘s The Enlightened Capitalists: Cautionary Tales of Business Pioneers Who Tried to Do Well by Doing Good (HarperBusiness, 2019) is a welcome addition to the current debate about what is the right... Read More
David Colander and Craig Freedman, “Where Economics Went Wrong: Chicago’s Abandonment of Classical Liberalism” (Princeton UP, 2018)
If you are reading this, you have probably run into the “Chicago” model at some point or another, in terms of public policy, orthodox modern finance, macro or micro economics, or any other arena where theoretical abstractions about human behavior (generally but not exclusively about or derived from economics) have... Read More
Daromir Rudnyckyj, “Beyond Debt: Islamic Experiments in Global Finance” (U Chicago Press, 2018)
Recent economic crises have made the centrality of debt, and the instability it creates, increasingly apparent. In Beyond Debt: Islamic Experiments in Global Finance (University of Chicago Press, 2019), anthropologist Daromir Rudnyckyj illustrates how the Malaysian state, led by the central bank, is seeking to make the country’s capital Kuala... Read More