New Books Network

Ashley E. Kerr, “Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860-1910)” (Vanderbilt UP, 2020)
Analyzing a wide variety of late-nineteenth-century sources, Sex, Skulls, and Citizens: Gender and Racial Science in Argentina (1860-1910) (Vanderbilt University Press, 2020) argues that Argentine scientific projects of the era were not just racial encounters, but were also conditioned by sexual relationships in all their messy, physical reality. The writers studied... Read More
Alec Ryrie, “Unbelievers: An Emotional History of Doubt” (Harvard UP, 2019)
In Unbelievers: An Emotional History of Doubt (Harvard University Press, 2019), Alec Ryrie, the award-winning author of Protestants offers a new vision of the birth of the secular age, looking to the feelings of ordinary men and women―so often left out of the history of atheism. Why have societies that were... Read More
Clifford Mason, “Macbeth in Harlem: Black Theater in America from the Beginning to Raisin in the Sun” (Rutgers UP, 2020)
Macbeth in Harlem: Black Theater in America from the Beginning to Raisin in the Sun (Rutgers University Press, 2020) by Clifford Mason, celebrated actor, director, writer, and playwright, and author of thirty-four plays, is a sweeping history of Black theatre from the early nineteenth century through 1959. With an “Introduction”... Read More
Anya P. Foxen, “Inhaling Spirit: Harmonialism, Orientalism, and the Western Roots of Modern Yoga” (Oxford UP, 2020)
In her new book Inhaling Spirit: Harmonialism, Orientalism, and the Western Roots of Modern Yoga (Oxford University Press, 2020), Anya Foxen traces several disparate yet entangled roots of modern yoga practice to show that much of what we call yoga in the West stems not only from pre-modern Indian yoga traditions, but... Read More
Philip A. Craig, “The Bond of Grace and Duty in the Soteriology of John Owen” (Founders Press, 2020) 
Philip A. Craig’s new book on John Owen, the premier puritan theologian, demonstrates how carefully his subject tracked the influence of antinomianism in his writing. Craig’s book roots Owen’s ideas of conversion in Augustine and Calvin. The Bond of Grace and Duty in the Soteriology of John Owen (Founders Press,... Read More
Henry M. Cowles, “The Scientific Method: An Evolution of Thinking from Darwin to Dewey” (Harvard UP, 2020)
The idea of a single scientific method, shared across specialties and teachable to ten-year-olds, is just over a hundred years old. For centuries prior, science had meant a kind of knowledge, made from facts gathered through direct observation or deduced from first principles. But during the nineteenth century, science came to mean... Read More
Nathan G. Alexander, “Race in a Godless World: Atheism, Race, and Civilization, 1850–1914” (NYU Press, 2019)
Is modern racism a product of secularization and the decline of Christian universalism? The debate has raged for decades, but up to now, the actual racial views of historical atheists and freethinkers have never been subjected to a systematic analysis.  In his new book, Race in a Godless World: Atheism, Race,... Read More
Aaron Kamugisha, “Beyond Coloniality: Citizenship and Freedom in the Caribbean Intellectual Tradition” (Indiana UP, 2019)
Aaron Kamugisha reads CLR James and Sylvia Wynter to glean from them ways to navigate the “beyond” of coloniality. In his new book Beyond Coloniality: Citizenship and Freedom in the Caribbean Intellectual Tradition (Indiana University Press, 2019), reminds us of a Caribbean radical tradition that is fiercely critical of racism, middle-class... Read More
A Very Square Peg: A Podcast Series about Polymath Robert Eisler. Episode 2: Value Theory
In this episode (# 2), we discuss Eisler’s early years as a member of the Jewish bourgeoisie in turn-of-the-century Vienna with historian Steven Beller. We also hear from the closest living relative of Robert Eisler, his grand-nephew Richard Regen. Philosopher Tom Hurka provides some background for understanding the arguments Eisler... Read More