New Books Network

Kabria Baumgartner, “In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America” (NYU Press, 2019)
In Pursuit of Knowledge: Black Women and Educational Activism in Antebellum America (NYU Press, 2019) is an intellectual and cultural history of the educational activism of African American women and girls in the long nineteenth century. Kabria Baumgartner focuses her narrative on the actions of “African American women and girls living... Read More
Sherrow O. Pinder et al., “Black Political Thought: From David Walker to the Present” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Black Political Thought: From David Walker to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2020) is a nuanced and long-needed anthology interrogates the “never ending issue” of the unequal positioning of black Americans by combining primary documents that highlight black political ideas and ideals with incisive scholarly commentary. In words of the... Read More
Zena Hitz, “Lost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life” (Princeton UP, 2020)
Do you have an active intellectual life? That is a question you may feel uncomfortable answering these days given that the very phrase “intellectual life” can strike some people as pretentious or self-indulgent, even irresponsible in a time of pandemic disease. But what better time could there be for an... Read More
Edgar Garcia, “Signs of the Americas: A Poetics of Pictography, Hieroglyphs and Khipu” (U Chicago Press, 2019)
In his sixth thesis on the philosophy of history, Walter Benjamin wrote, “The only writer of history with the gift of setting alight the sparks of hope in the past, is the one who is convinced of this: that not even the dead will be safe from the enemy, if... Read More
Lara Harb, “Arabic Poetics: Aesthetic Experience in Classical Arabic Literature” (Cambridge UP, 2020)
Lara Harb’s Arabic Poetics: Aesthetic Experience in Classical Arabic Literature (Cambridge University Press, 2020) is a delightful and formidable study on the details and development of poetics and aesthetics in medieval Arabic literature. The central theme of this splendid book centers on the emergence of the evocation of wonder as... Read More
Garrett Felber, “Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State” (UNC Press, 2020)
Challenging incarceration and policing was central to the post-war Black Freedom Movement. In his new book Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State (UNC Press, 2020), Garrett Felber centers the Nation in the Civil Rights Era and the making of the... Read More
Fadi A. Bardawil, “Revolution and Disenchantment: Arab Marxism and the Binds of Emancipation” (Duke UP, 2020)
In his Theses on Feuerbach, Marx famously claimed that philosophers had previously only attempted to interpret the world; the point, however, was to change it. In the 20th century, no philosopher had as great an effect on the world than Marx, with various intellectual and political movements across the world... Read More
Robert Pippin, “Filmed Thought: Cinema as Reflective Form” (U Chicago Press, 2020)
Robert Pippin‘s book Filmed Thought: Cinema as Reflective Form (University of Chicago Press, 2020) is a work in the philosophy of film published in 2020 by the University of Chicago Press. Each chapter in Filmed Thought treats a film in-depth, including works by Hitchcock, Ray, Malick, Sirk, Almodovar, Polanski, and the... Read More
Matthew Duncombe, “Ancient Relativity: Plato, Aristotle, Stoics and Skeptics” (Oxford UP, 2020)
As a matter of basic metaphysics, we classify individuals in terms of their relations to other things – for example, a parent is a parent of someone, a larger object is larger than a smaller object. The nature of relativity – the question of how things relate to other things... Read More